Economic News Release

Extended Mass Layoffs (Quarterly) News Release


Technical information:  (202) 691-6392     USDL 09-0506
               http://www.bls.gov/mls/
                                           For release:  10:00 A.M. (EDT)
Media contact:          (202) 691-5902     Tuesday, May 12, 2009
                                   
                                   
          EXTENDED MASS LAYOFFS IN THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2009
                                   
                                   
   Employers initiated 3,489 mass layoff events in the first quarter
of 2009 that resulted in the separation of 558,909 workers from their
jobs for at least 31 days, according to preliminary figures released
by the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics.  Both
the number of extended mass layoff events and associated separations
reached their highest first quarter levels in program history (with
data available back to 1996), and both measures more than doubled 
from the first quarter of 2008.  (See table A.)
   
   The number of separations reached first quarter program highs in 12
of 18 major industry sectors, all 4 geographic regions, and 32 states.
Separations due to business demand reasons (especially slack work/in-
sufficient demand) set a program high, while those associated with fi-
nancial issues reached a high for the first quarter.  Each category 
more than tripled over the year.  Twenty-seven percent of employers 
reporting an extended layoff in the first quarter of 2009 indicated 
they anticipated some recall of workers, the lowest proportion in pro-
gram history.  First quarter 2009 layoff data are preliminary and are 
subject to revision.  (See the Technical Note.)
  
   The national unemployment rate averaged 8.8 percent, not seasonally
adjusted, in the first quarter of 2009, up from 5.3 percent a year
earlier.  Private nonfarm payroll employment, not seasonally adjusted,
decreased by 3.1 percent (-4,342,000) over the year.
   
Industry Distribution of Extended Layoffs
      
   Manufacturing firms reported 1,380 extended mass layoff events
involving 215,281 separations, the highest first quarter levels for


   ____________________________________________________________
  |                                                            |
  |    Upcoming Changes to the Extended Mass Layoffs Release   |
  |                                                            |
  |    Changes will be introduced with the issuance of 2nd     |
  | quarter 2009 preliminary extended mass layoff data sched-  |
  | uled for release on Wednesday, August 12, 2009.  For fur-  |
  | ther information on these changes, see the note on page 9. |
  |                                                            |
  |____________________________________________________________|
   

                               - 2 -


Table A. Selected measures of extended mass layoff activity


     Period                  Layoff events       Separations     Initial claimants

     2005

January-March ..........          1,142            186,506            185,486
April-June .............          1,203            246,099            212,673
July-September .........          1,136            201,878            190,186
October-December .......          1,400            250,178            246,188

     2006

January-March ..........            963            183,089            193,510
April-June .............          1,353            295,964            264,927
July-September .........            929            160,254            161,764
October-December .......          1,640            296,662            330,954

     2007

January-March ..........          1,110            225,600            199,250
April-June .............          1,421            278,719            259,234
July-September .........          1,018            160,024            173,077
October-December .......          1,814            301,592            347,151

     2008

January-March (r) ......          1,340            230,098            259,292
April-June (r) .........          1,756            354,713            339,574
July-September (r) .....          1,582            290,892            303,774
October-December (r) ...          3,585            642,154            762,737

     2009

January-March (p) ......          3,489            558,909            542,023


    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    
    
the industry on record (with data available back to 1996).  Manufac-
turing industries were responsible for 40 percent of private nonfarm 
extended layoff events and 39 percent of related separations in the 
first quarter of 2009.  A year earlier, manufacturing made up 31 per-
cent of events and 37 percent of separations.  (See table 1.)  The 
largest numbers of separations within manufacturing were associated 
with transportation equipment manufacturing (65,304, mostly associated 
with automobile manufacturing) and computer and electronic products 
manufacturing (23,706).
   
   In the first quarter of 2009, 12 major industry sectors reported
first quarter program highs in terms of the number of worker separa-
tions--mining; construction; manufacturing; wholesale trade; transpor-
tation and warehousing; finance and insurance; real estate and rental 
and leasing; professional and technical services; management of com-
panies and enterprises; administrative and waste services; educational 
services; and accommodation and food services.


                               - 3 -


Table B.  Distribution of extended layoff events and separations by 
economic reason categories, January-March 2009(p)


                                     Layoff events                 Separations
    Category
                                  Number      Percent          Number      Percent

     Total ..................      3,489       100.0           558,909      100.0

Business demand .............      1,921        55.1           279,022       49.9
Organizational changes ......        183         5.2            41,409        7.4
Financial issues ............        392        11.2            89,487       16.0
Production specific .........         15         0.4             3,944        0.7
Disaster/safety .............          5         0.1               478        0.1
Seasonal ....................        316         9.1            47,598        8.5
Other/miscellaneous .........        657        18.8            96,971       17.4


    p = preliminary.
    
    
Reasons for Extended Layoffs
   
   Among the seven categories of economic reasons for extended mass
layoffs, business demand factors (contract cancellation, contract
completion, domestic competition, excess inventory, import competition, 
and slack work) accounted for 55 percent of the events and 50 percent 
of separations during the first quarter of 2009.  This compared to 45 
percent of events and 40 percent of separations in the same period a 
year earlier.  (See table 2.)  Separations related to these business 
demand factors more than tripled over the year from 91,585 to 279,022, 
with those due to slack work/insufficient demand/nonseasonal business 
slowdown increasing from 56,494 to 211,168.


   Extended mass layoffs stemming from financial issues (bankruptcy,
cost control, and financial difficulty) sharply increased from 122
events associated with 26,859 separations in the first quarter 2008 
to 392 events and 89,487 separations in the first quarter 2009.  Re-
tail trade accounted for the largest number of separations due to fi-
nancial issues, mostly in electronics and appliance stores and in gen-
eral merchandise stores.
   
Movement of Work
   
   In the first quarter of 2009, 77 extended mass layoffs involved 
the movement of work and were associated with 12,736 separated workers.
(See table C.)  A year earlier, there were 59 layoff events and 13,314
separations associated with the movement of work.  These movements of
work were to other domestic locations or to locations outside of the
U.S., and they occurred either within the same company or to other com-
panies.  Movement of work layoffs accounted for 2 percent of nonseasonal 
layoff events in the first quarter of 2009.  (See table 10.)
   
   Among the 77 extended mass layoff events with reported relocation
of work in the first quarter of 2009, 45 percent were permanent clo-
sures of worksites, which affected 5,711 workers.  In comparison,
10 percent of the total extended mass layoff events reported for the
quarter involved the permanent closure of worksites and affected
90,960 workers.
   
   Of the layoffs involving the movement of work, 75 percent of the
events and 77 percent of the laid-off workers were from manufacturing
industries during the first quarter.  (See table 7.)  Among all pri-
vate nonfarm extended layoffs, manufacturing accounted for 40 percent 
of the events and 39 percent of separations.


                               - 4 -


Table C. Extended mass layoff events and separations, selected measures,
first quarter 2009(p)


        Action                            Layoff events         Separations

   Total, private nonfarm ................     3,489             558,909

     Total, excluding seasonal and 
       vacation events (1) ...............     3,173             511,311

        Total events with movement
           of work (2) ...................        77              12,736

           Movement of work actions ......       105                 (3)
              With separations reported ..        70               7,295
              With separations unknown ...        35                 (3)


   1 The questions on movement of work were not asked of employers when the reason
for layoff was either seasonal work or vacation period.
   2 A layoff event can involve more than one movement of work action.
   3 Data are not available.
   p = preliminary.
    
    
   In the total private nonfarm sector, 55 percent of the extended mass
layoff events were because of business demand changes.  Similarly, such
reasons accounted for 49 percent of layoff events associated with work
relocation and resulted in 5,345 separations during the first quarter.  
(See table 8.)
   
   Among the regions, the Midwest accounted for the largest proportion
of workers affected by extended mass layoffs associated with the move-
ment of work (44 percent) followed by the South (26 percent) and the 
West (21 percent).  (See table 9.)  Among the 50 states and the District 
of Columbia, Illinois accounted for the largest proportion of workers af-
fected by extended mass layoffs associated with the movement of work 
(18 percent), followed by California (11 percent) and Texas (9 percent).
   
   Some extended mass layoff events involve more than one relocation
of work action.  For example, an extended mass layoff event at an
employer may involve job loss due to movement of work to both another
domestic location of the company and a location out of the country;
this would be counted as two movement of work actions.  The 77 extended 
layoff events with movement of work for the first quarter of 2009 in-
volved 105 identifiable relocations of work.  An identifiable reloca-
tion of work occurs when the employer provides sufficient information 
on the new location of work and/or the number of workers affected by 
the movement.  Of the 105 relocations, employers were able to provide 
information on the specific number of separations associated with the 
movement of work component of the layoff in 70 actions involving 7,295 
workers.  (See table 10.)
   
   Of the 70 actions where employers were able to provide more complete 
separations information, 93 percent of relocations occurred within the 
same company and 71 percent were domestic reassignments. (See table D.)  
Domestic relocation of work affected 3,829 workers, and out-of-country 
relocations were associated with 3,466 separations, less than 1 percent 
of all nonseasonal and nonvacation extended mass layoff separations.  
(See table 11.)


                               - 5 -


Table D. Movement of work actions by type of separation where the
number of separations is known by employers, first quarter 2009(p)


         Activities                         Actions(1)       Separations

 With separations reported ..........           70               7,295


        By location

   Out-of-country relocations .......           20               3,466
      Within company ................           20               3,466
      Different company .............            -                 -  

   Domestic relocations .............           50               3,829
      Within company ................           45               3,483
      Different company .............            5                 346


        By company

   Within company ...................           65               6,949
      Domestic ......................           45               3,483
      Out of country ................           20               3,466

   Different company ................            5                 346
      Domestic ......................            5                 346
      Out of country ................            -                 -  


   1 Only actions for which separations associated with the movement of
work were reported are shown.
   p = preliminary.
    
    
Recall Expectations
   
   Twenty-seven percent of employers reporting an extended layoff in
the first quarter of 2009 indicated they anticipated some type of
recall, down from 40 percent a year earlier and the lowest proportion
in program history (with data available back to 1995).  (See table E.)
Of those employers expecting to recall workers, a program low 20 percent 
indicated that the offer would be extended to all displaced employees, 
and 63 percent of employers anticipated extending the offer to at least 
half of the workers.  Sixty-one percent of employers expecting to recall 
laid-off employees intend to do so within 6 months.  Excluding layoff 
events due to seasonal work and vacation period, in which 89 percent of 
the employers expected a recall, employers anticipated recalling laid-off 
workers in 21 percent of the events.
   
Size of Extended Layoffs
   
   The average size of a layoff (as measured by separations per layoff
event) in the first quarter of 2009 was 160, compared to 172 per layoff 
in first quarter 2008.  Layoff events continued to be concentrated at 
the lower end of the extended layoff-size spectrum, with 49 percent of 
events involving between 50 and 99 workers and 71 percent of events with 
less than 150 workers.  Similarly, the proportion of events involving 
more than 500 workers, less than 4 percent, is the lowest proportion 
for any quarter since the program began.


                               - 6 -


Table E. Summary of employer expectations of a recall from extended layoff,
first quarter 2008 - first quarter 2009


                                                       Percentage of events

   Nature of the recall                       I        II        III       IV         I
                                            2008      2008      2008      2008(r)   2009(p)

 Anticipate a recall .............          40.1      51.1      28.6      42.8      26.9


        Timeframe

     Within 6 months .............          69.8      84.5      71.0      77.4      60.7
        Within 3 months ..........          45.4      59.1      53.8      34.0      38.8


        Size

     At least half ...............          73.2      88.3      77.0      77.6      62.6
        All workers ..............          28.5      51.7      37.6      35.4      19.7


    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    
    

   Layoffs involving between 50 and 99 workers accounted for 21 percent 
of all separations during the period, and layoffs with less than 150 sep-
arated workers accounted for 37 percent.  These proportions are up from 
18 and 35 percent respectively from a year earlier.  Separations involving 
500 or more workers accounted for 25 percent of all separations in the 
first quarter of 2009, down slightly from a year earlier.  (See table F.)

Initial Claimant Characteristics
   
   A total of 542,023 initial claimants for unemployment insurance
were associated with extended mass layoffs in the first quarter of
2009.  Of these claimants, 13 percent were black, 15 percent were
Hispanic, 33 percent were women, 34 percent were 30 to 44 years of
age, and 18 percent were 55 years of age or older.  (See table 3.)
Among persons in the civilian labor force for the same period, 11
percent were black, 14 percent were Hispanic, 47 percent were women,
33 percent were age 30 to 44, and 19 percent were 55 years of age or
older.
   
Geographic Distribution
   
   Among the 4 census regions, the West recorded the highest number of
separations (174,526) due to extended mass layoff events in the first
quarter of 2009, followed by the Midwest with 170,062.  All regions
reported first quarter program highs in terms of the number of worker
separations (with data available back to 1996).  (See table 4.)  Among
the 9 census divisions, the highest number of separations during the
first quarter of 2009 was in the Pacific division (140,311).  The East
North Central division had the next highest level of separations, with
139,795.  (See table 4.)  All divisions, except the East South Central, 
reported their highest first quarter number of separations in program 
history.


                               - 7 -


Table F. Distribution of extended layoff events by size of layoff,
first quarter 2009(p)


                                      Layoff events                Separations
     Size
                                   Number      Percent         Number       Percent

 Total .....................        3,489       100.0          558,909       100.0

   50-99 ...................        1,725        49.4          120,085        21.5
   100-149 .................          742        21.3           87,518        15.7
   150-199 .................          366        10.5           61,373        11.0
   200-299 .................          343         9.8           79,657        14.3
   300-499 .................          188         5.4           68,369        12.2
   500-999 .................           86         2.5           58,626        10.5
   1,000 or more ...........           39         1.1           83,281        14.9

   p = preliminary.
   
   
   California recorded the largest number of worker separations
(115,014), followed by Michigan (46,817), Illinois (41,887), and Texas
(33,005).  (See table 5.)  After excluding the impact of seasonal rea-
sons, California still reported the highest number of job cuts (108,899).  
Thirty-two states reported first quarter program highs in terms of num-
bers of separations--Alaska, Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, 
Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New 
York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, 
Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

   Forty-three percent of extended mass layoff events and 39 percent
of separations (218,194) occurred in metropolitan areas in the first
quarter of 2009, compared with 49 percent of events and 45 percent of
separations (104,617) during the first quarter of 2008.  Among the 372
metropolitan areas, Detroit-Warren-Livonia, Mich., reported the highest 
number of separations (14,781) in the first quarter of 2009.  Next were 
Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Ill.-Ind.-Wis., with 13,647 separations and 
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, Calif., with 10,594 separations.  (See 
table G.)  Employers located in nonmetropolitan areas separated 50,262 
workers in extended mass layoffs.
   

                               - 8 -


Table G. Mass layoff events and separations, selected metropolitan areas


                                                      Events               Separations
            
            Metropolitan area                        I       I             I         I
                                                   2008(r) 2009(p)       2008(r)   2009(p)

Total, nonmetropolitan areas ....................    122     392          19,690    50,262

Total, 372 metropolitan areas ...................    661   1,513         104,617   218,194

    Detroit-Warren-Livonia, Mich. ...............     26      57           4,426    14,781
    Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Ill.-Ind.-Wis. ...     47      87           7,711    13,647
    Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, Calif. ....     86     100          13,416    10,594
    New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island,
          N.Y.-N.J.-Pa. .........................     47      61           9,204     8,688
    Las Vegas-Paradise, Nev. .......                   6      55           1,126     8,367
    San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, Calif. .......     39      50           4,764     7,736
    Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas ...........     (1)     26             (1)     7,184
    Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas ..........      6      18           1,159     4,784
    Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington,
          Minn.-Wis. ............................      9      37           1,250     4,172
    Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif. ....     19      38           2,250     4,107

   1 Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.
   r = revised.
   p = preliminary.
   NOTE:  The geographic boundaries of the metropolitan areas shown in this table are 
defined in Office of Management and Budget Bulletin 09-01, November 20, 2008.


Note
   
   The quarterly series on extended mass layoffs cover layoffs of at
least 31-days duration that involve 50 or more individuals from a single 
employer filing initial claims for unemployment insurance during a con-
secutive 5-week period.  Approximately 30 days after a mass layoff is 
triggered, the employer is contacted for additional information.  Data 
for the first quarter are preliminary and subject to revision.  This 
release also includes revised data for previous quarters.  Data are not 
seasonally adjusted, but survey data suggest that there is a seasonal 
pattern to layoffs.  Thus, comparisons between consecutive quarters 
should not be used as an indicator of trend.
   
   For additional information about the program, see the Technical Note.
                                   
                    ______________________________


   The report on Mass Layoffs in April 2009 is scheduled to be released on 
Friday, May 22, 2009.


                               - 9 -


   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  |                                                                                   |
  |                          Upcoming Changes to the Extended                         |
  |                             Mass Layoffs News Release                             |
  |                                                                                   |
  |    The following changes will be introduced with the issuance of 2nd quarter      |
  | 2009 preliminary extended mass layoff data scheduled for release on Wednesday,    |
  | August 12, 2009.                                                                  |
  |                                                                                   |
  |    --Tables B-D will be dropped, as the information is replicated within the      |
  |      current numbered tables 2, 10, and 11, respectively.                         |
  |                                                                                   |
  |    --Table E will become the new table 11.  This table will be expanded to show   |
  |      the recall expectations of employers disaggregated by whether extended lay-  |
  |      off events were due to seasonal/vacation factors or nonseasonal factors.     |
  |                                                                                   |
  |    --Table F will become table 13.                                                |
  |                                                                                   |
  |    --Table G will undergo a conceptual change and will become a new table B.      |
  |      Currently this table reflects a concept of "worksite location," where the    |
  |      numbers of extended layoff events and associated separated workers are       |
  |      displayed by the metropolitan statistical area where the event occurred.     |
  |      This concept of "worksite location" will be replaced by a "separated worker  |
  |      residence" concept, where the number of initial claimants associated with    |
  |      extended layoffs will be displayed by the metropolitan statistical area      |
  |      where the separated workers reside.  This conceptual change will result in   |
  |      more complete information on layoffs in metropolitan areas.                  |
  |                                                                                   |
  |    --Table 6 will be dropped from the news release as there is often only a small |
  |      amount of layoff activity in these IT-producing industries.  This table      |
  |      will be provided as a supplemental table on the Mass Layoff Statistics       |
  |      Web site at http://www.bls.gov/mls/#tables.  Tables 7-11 will be renum-      |
  |      bered tables 6-10.                                                           |
  |                                                                                   |
  |    --A new table, table 12, will be added to the release displaying the average   |
  |      size of layoff events by industry and reason for layoff.                     |
  |                                                                                   |
  |    --The explanatory language in the body of the news release regarding movement  |
  |      of work data will be transferred to the Technical Note.                      |
  |                                                                                   |
   ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 





                                  - 10 -



Technical Note

   The  Mass Layoff Statistics (MLS) program is a federal-state program 
which identifies, describes, and tracks the effects of major job cutbacks,
using data from each state's unemployment insurance database.  Employers
which have at least 50 initial claims filed against them during a con-
secutive 5-week period are contacted by the state agency to determine
whether these separations are of at least 31 days duration, and, if so,
information is obtained on the total number of persons separated and the
reasons for these separations.  Employers are identified according to in-
dustry classification and location, and unemployment insurance claimants
are identified by such demographic factors as age, race, gender, ethnic
group, and place of residence.  The program yields information on an
individual's entire spell of unemployment, to the point when regular
unemployment insurance benefits are exhausted.

Definitions

   Employer.  Employers in the MLS program include those covered by state
unemployment insurance laws.  Information on employers is obtained from the
Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, which is admini-
stered by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

   Extended layoff event.  Fifty or more initial claims for unemployment
insurance benefits from an employer during a 5-week period, with at least
50 workers separated for more than 30 days.

   Initial claimant.  A person who files any notice of unemployment to
initiate a request either for a determination of entitlement to and eligi-
bility for compensation, or for a subsequent period of unemployment within
a benefit year or period of eligibility.

   Layoff.  The separation of persons from an employer as part of a mass
layoff event.  (See below.)  Such layoffs involve both persons subject to
recall and those who are terminated by the establishment.

   Mass layoff.  Fifty or more initial claims for unemployment insurance
benefits from an employer beginning in a given month, regardless of dura-
tion.

   Worksite closure.  The complete closure of either multi-unit or single-
unit employers or the partial closure of a multi-unit employer where entire
worksites affected by layoffs are closed or planned to be closed.


                                  - 11 -


Revisions to preliminary data

The latest quarterly data in this news release are considered preliminary.
After the initial publication of quarterly information, more data are col-
lected as remaining employer interviews for the quarter are completed and
additional initial claimant information associated with extended layoff
events is received.

Movement of work concepts and questions

   Because of the employer interview component, the BLS decided to use
the MLS program as a vehicle for collecting additional information on
offshoring and outsourcing associated with job loss, by adding questions
that address movement of work.  The term "moving work" means that the
company experiencing the layoff has reassigned work activities that were
performed at a worksite by the company's employees (1) to another work-
site within the company; (2) to another company under formal arrangements 
at the same worksite; or (3) to another company under formal arrangements 
at another worksite.  The type of work activities subject to movement can
include accounting, customer service, cleaning, warehousing, etc.

   "Overseas relocation" is the movement of work from within the U.S. to
locations outside of the U.S. "Overseas relocation" can occur within the
same company and involve movement of work to a different location of that
company outside of the U.S., or to a different company altogether.

   "Domestic relocation" is the movement of work to other locations inside
the U.S., either within the same company or to a different company.

   "Overseas relocation" and "domestic relocation" are no longer used in the
same way as they were in earlier extended mass layoff news releases.  There-
fore, the data presented in this news release are not comparable to those
that were presented in earlier news releases.

   Questions on movement of work and location are asked for all identified
layoff events when the reason for separation is other than "seasonal work"
or "vacation period."  Seasonal and vacation layoff events were excluded
because movement of work appears unlikely.

   Questions on movement of work are asked after the analyst verifies that 
a layoff in fact occurred and lasted more than 30 days, and obtained the
total number of workers separated from jobs, the date the layoff began, and
the economic reason for the layoff.  If the reason for layoff is other than
seasonal or vacation, the employer was asked the following:

   (1) "Did this layoff include your company moving work from this loca-
tion(s) to a different geographic location(s) within your company?"

   (2) "Did this layoff include your company moving work that was performed
in-house by your employees to a different company, through contractual ar-
rangements?"

   A "yes" response to either question is followed by:

   "Is the location inside or outside of the U.S.?" and "How many of the
layoffs were a result of this relocation?"

   Layoff actions are classified as "overseas relocation" if the employer
responds "yes" to questions 1 and/or 2, and indicates that the location(s)
was outside of the U.S.  Domestic relocation is determined if the employer
responds "yes" to questions 1 and/or 2 and indicates that the location(s)
was within the U.S.

   After asking the movement of work questions, the employer interview
continues and responses are obtained for questions on recall expectations
and open/closed status of the worksite.


                                  - 12 - 


Reliability of the data

   The identification of employers and layoff events in the MLS program
and associated characteristics of claimants is based on administrative
data on covered establishments and unemployment insurance claims, and,
therefore, is not subject to issues associated with sampling error.
Nonsampling errors such as typographical errors may occur but are not
likely to be significant.  While the MLS employers and layoff events
are not subject to sampling error, and all such employers are asked the
interview questions, the employer responses are subject to nonsampling 
error.  Nonsampling error can occur for many reasons, including the in-
ability to obtain information for all respondents, inability or unwill-
ingness of respondents to provide correct information, and errors made 
in the collection or processing of the data.  For the first quarter of
2009, outright refusal to participate in the employer interview accounted
for 4.0 percent of all private nonfarm events.  Although included in the
total number of instances involving the movement of work, for the first
quarter, employers in 35 relocations were unable to provide the number of
separations specifically associated with the movement of work, 7 of which
involved out-of-country moves.

Other information

   Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired
individuals upon request.  Voice phone: 202-691-5200; TDD message referral
phone: 1-800-877-8339.





Table 1. Industry distribution: Extended mass layoff events, separations, and initial claimants for unemployment insurance,
private nonfarm sector, selected quarters, 2008 and 2009

                                                                                                            Initial claimants for  
                                                         Layoff events              Separations             unemployment insurance 
                      Industry                                                                                                     
                                                      I      IV       I         I       IV        I          I       IV        I   
                                                    2008r   2008r   2009p     2008r    2008r    2009p      2008r    2008r    2009p 
                                                                                                                                   
      Total, private nonfarm(1) ..................  1,340   3,585   3,489    230,098  642,154  558,909    259,292  762,737  542,023

    Mining .......................................      5      43      79        474    7,013   13,051        428    8,137   11,465
    Utilities ....................................    (2)       5     (2)        (2)      977      (2)        (2)      897      (2)
    Construction .................................    337     915     492     36,917  113,978   56,321     45,231  137,894   52,969
    Manufacturing ................................    422   1,287   1,380     84,318  239,215  215,281    106,177  338,237  238,792
         Food ....................................     65     106      73     14,777   24,532   10,840     15,207   25,402   10,216
         Beverage and tobacco products ...........      8     (2)      12      1,436      (2)    1,728      2,040      (2)    2,192
         Textile mills ...........................     12      28      17      1,758    5,763    1,859      8,054   12,225    4,377
         Textile product mills ...................    (2)      12       8        (2)    1,584      985        (2)    2,103    1,971
         Apparel .................................     10      14      17        952    2,094    1,833      1,316    2,387    1,709
         Leather and allied products .............    (2)     (2)       5        (2)      (2)      643        (2)      (2)      561
         Wood products ...........................     41      99      82      5,408   14,481    9,803      7,590   19,602   11,336
         Paper ...................................      7      31      35        595    4,351    4,360        814    5,451    4,548
         Printing and related support activities .      6      14      38        584    2,135    4,733        620    3,207    4,107
         Petroleum and coal products .............    (2)      18       6        (2)    2,508      784        (2)    2,746      555

         Chemicals ...............................      9      30      27      1,289    4,845    3,956        762    5,463    3,410
         Plastics and rubber products ............     21      83      76      2,963    9,955    7,576      2,660   14,102    7,852
         Nonmetallic mineral products ............     39     109      71      4,274   16,131    6,631      4,568   18,805    7,291
         Primary metals ..........................     14      80      91      2,659   14,599   13,472      2,489   18,452   14,343
         Fabricated metal products ...............     27     126     143      3,468   15,611   14,976      4,198   22,588   18,259
         Machinery ...............................     20      67     138      3,155   10,967   23,494      3,378   18,857   27,990
         Computer and electronic products ........     23      69     138      3,614   11,778   23,706      3,109   14,158   22,471
         Electrical equipment and appliances .....     11      38      52      1,994    7,714    6,654      3,192   11,436    7,534
         Transportation equipment ................     78     289     265     30,142   78,819   65,304     41,534  125,639   73,425
         Furniture and related products ..........     20      42      56      3,183    6,854    8,445      3,251   10,358   11,237
         Miscellaneous manufacturing .............      7      19      30      1,555    2,910    3,499        834    3,578    3,408

    Wholesale trade ..............................     35      90     118      3,745   11,909   14,373      3,847   13,432   12,776
    Retail trade .................................    107     202     347     24,119   61,326   78,394     30,444   53,466   58,636
    Transportation and warehousing ...............     49     118     136     10,250   23,001   23,197      8,552   21,839   19,174
    Information ..................................     27      73      80      7,330   10,290   11,705      5,784   11,887   12,294
    Finance and insurance ........................     99     113     135     18,811   22,742   23,574     20,411   24,568   21,254
    Real estate and rental and leasing ...........      5      27      30        612    3,592    3,041        746    4,023    2,840
    Professional and technical services ..........     39      88     130      7,346   12,803   15,318      6,313   13,865   13,497
    Management of companies and enterprises ......    (2)      17      19        (2)    3,138    2,551        (2)    3,119    1,741
    Administrative and waste services ............     96     319     296     15,710   72,104   64,697     15,885   78,130   61,672
    Educational services .........................      5       4     (2)        595      630      (2)        618      474      (2)
    Health care and social assistance ............     20      39      33      5,302    6,764    3,931      2,643    5,384    3,547
    Arts, entertainment, and recreation ..........     20      63      41      2,504   14,609    5,701      1,833    8,696    4,464
    Accommodation and food services ..............     63     153     141     10,694   34,591   24,637      8,772   34,994   23,735
    Other services, except public administration .      5      28      23        524    3,399    2,027        590    3,622    2,311

    Unclassified .................................      1       1       -        250       73        -        133       73        -
                                                                                                                                   
    1 For the first quarter of 2009, data on layoffs were reported by employers in all states and the District of Columbia. 
    2 Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.    
    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    NOTE: Dash represents zero.







Table 2. Reason for layoff: Extended mass layoff events, separations, and initial claimants for unemployment insurance, 
private nonfarm sector, selected quarters, 2008 and 2009

                                                                                                         Initial claimants for   
                                             Layoff events                   Separations                 unemployment insurance  
         Reason for layoff                                                                                                       
                                        I        IV         I           I         IV        I            I         IV        I   
                                      2008r     2008r     2009p       2008r     2008r     2009p        2008r     2008r     2009p 
                                                                                                                                 
   Total, private nonfarm(1) ......   1,340     3,585     3,489      230,098   642,154   558,909      259,292   762,737   542,023

Business demand ...................     600     1,581     1,921       91,585   248,225   279,022      124,840   371,289   303,941
  Contract cancellation ...........      18        57        80        2,417    11,692    11,297        2,201    12,981    11,141
  Contract completion .............     227       313       302       28,319    45,504    51,372       36,097    63,253    50,182
  Domestic competition ............       -         4         4            -       470       445            -       636       420
  Excess inventory/saturated 
    market ........................       7        18        29        1,559     4,021     3,724          876     4,203     3,578
  Import competition ..............      15        14         6        2,796     1,855     1,016        2,640     2,603       991
  Slack work/insufficient demand/
    non-seasonal business slowdown.     333     1,175     1,500       56,494   184,683   211,168       83,026   287,613   237,629

Organizational changes ............     114       159       183       21,674    31,006    41,409       22,911    33,471    34,402
  Business-ownership change .......      22        31        32        4,990     8,430     9,270        2,986     5,981     5,076
  Reorganization or restructuring 
    of company ....................      92       128       151       16,684    22,576    32,139       19,925    27,490    29,326

Financial issues ..................     122       330       392       26,859    73,604    89,487       25,068    68,258    63,386
  Bankruptcy ......................      26        45        80        6,488    12,022    26,978        3,782     7,268    13,087
  Cost control/cost cutting/
    increase profitability ........      40       165       212        6,509    24,679    32,471       10,363    33,251    33,454
  Financial difficulty ............      56       120       100       13,862    36,903    30,038       10,923    27,739    16,845

Production specific ...............      29        24        15       11,823     4,644     3,944        8,589     4,123     2,388
  Automation/technological 
    advances ......................       4       (2)       (2)          579       (2)       (2)          557       (2)       (2)
  Energy related ..................       -       (2)       (2)            -       (2)       (2)            -       (2)       (2)
  Governmental regulations/
    intervention ..................       5         7       (2)        2,083     1,549       (2)          654       913       (2)
  Labor dispute/contract 
    negotiations/strike ...........       5         5       (2)        5,194       630       (2)        3,027       588       (2)
  Material or supply shortage .....       6         -       (2)        2,356         -       (2)        2,955         -       (2)
  Model changeover ................       -       (2)       (2)            -       (2)       (2)            -       (2)       (2)
  Plant or machine repair/
    maintenance ...................       5         5       (2)          507     1,357       (2)          416     1,248       (2)
  Product line discontinued .......       4         3         6        1,104       590     1,165          980       700       735

Disaster/safety ...................       8        12         5        1,979     1,346       478        1,895     1,325       451
  Hazardous work environment ......     (2)         -         -          (2)         -         -          (2)         -         -
  Natural disaster (not weather 
    related) ......................       -         -       (2)            -         -       (2)            -         -       (2)
  Non-natural disaster ............     (2)       (2)       (2)          (2)       (2)       (2)          (2)       (2)       (2)
  Extreme weather-related event ...       5       (2)       (2)          986       (2)       (2)        1,188       (2)       (2)

Seasonal ..........................     246       869       316       43,107   149,757    47,598       42,330   147,883    42,738
  Seasonal ........................     246       863       316       43,107   148,433    47,598       42,330   146,502    42,738
  Vacation period-school related 
    or otherwise ..................       -         6         -            -     1,324         -            -     1,381         -

Other/miscellaneous ...............     221       610       657       33,071   133,572    96,971       33,659   136,388    94,717
  Other ...........................      23        26        32        3,466     4,243     5,171        4,737     6,844     4,291
  Data not provided: refusal ......      63       129       142       12,339    40,046    24,618       11,959    40,032    24,382
  Data not provided: does not 
    know ..........................     135       455       483       17,266    89,283    67,182       16,963    89,512    66,044


    1 See footnote 1, table 1.
    2 Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.
    r = revised.     
    p = preliminary.
    NOTE: Dash represents zero.







Table 3. State and selected claimant characteristics: Extended mass layoff events and initial claimants for unemployment insurance, 
private nonfarm sector, fourth quarter 2008 and first quarter 2009

                                                         Total                              Percent of total                       
                                                        initial                          Hispanic                    Persons age 55
                                  Layoff events        claimants          Black           origin          Women         and over   
              State                                                                                                                
                                   IV       I        IV        I         IV      I       IV      I       IV      I       IV      I 
                                  2008r   2009p     2008r    2009p      2008r  2009p    2008r  2009p    2008r  2009p    2008r  2009p
                                                                                                                                   
    Total, private nonfarm(1) ..  3,585   3,489    762,737  542,023     12.6   12.8     15.5   15.3     30.7   33.4     16.7   17.8

Alabama ........................     17      21      8,447    4,149     42.6   42.2      2.4    1.9     40.2   34.8     13.3   13.6
Alaska .........................     12       7      2,363    1,120      3.9    2.3     12.8   12.0     28.9   25.3     22.3   26.1
Arizona ........................     30      36      5,611    5,123      5.7    5.3     33.1   35.7     35.8   33.3     14.2   15.3
Arkansas .......................     20       9      3,159    1,658     17.2   29.4      4.0    4.9     39.2   26.8     16.9   14.4
California .....................    766     842    132,375  107,072      7.2    7.6     41.1   36.0     36.7   36.0     14.8   15.4
Colorado .......................     31      33      4,142    4,317      3.9    6.0     36.6   17.3     17.6   33.8     19.2   16.4
Connecticut ....................     11      30      2,278    3,684     10.2   13.7     10.7   15.1     18.4   49.4     19.8   23.0
Delaware .......................      7       7        973    1,332     21.3   11.8      4.6    1.4     19.1   14.5     22.0   12.1
District of Columbia ...........    (2)     (2)        (2)      (2)     97.8   38.8       .5   12.4     63.2   58.4      9.7    6.2
Florida ........................    180     137     37,472   26,389     14.4   15.6     26.7   27.8     36.1   35.0     18.4   19.4
Georgia ........................     59      59     16,008   11,381     36.5   42.7      6.5    4.9     37.3   44.8     15.8   16.5
Hawaii .........................     10      12      1,318    1,103      3.0    3.8     12.7   11.9     22.1   26.1     15.2   14.1
Idaho ..........................     51      24      8,397    3,216       .3     .2     11.8   10.9     34.1   35.6     15.2   18.3

Illinois .......................    286     240     60,441   36,253     17.1   16.5     16.0   13.8     28.4   32.0     14.7   17.1
Indiana ........................    154     104     44,383   15,133      6.7    8.5      4.0    2.0     27.2   31.2     14.8   17.4
Iowa ...........................     45      36     10,735    9,270      1.6    2.3      3.6    1.9     24.6   31.7     18.7   17.1
Kansas .........................     25      27      4,238    3,009      8.3   10.2      5.4    4.6     30.4   31.5     13.9   16.2
Kentucky .......................     67      26     12,602    3,464      5.8    3.9       .3     .2     17.2   10.6     13.8   19.0
Louisiana ......................     22      29      4,429    3,974     51.9   36.0      1.9    3.9     26.8   19.5     18.5   23.1
Maine ..........................      7      11      1,249    1,479       .6    1.6       .2     .4     20.4   34.0     23.5   22.9
Maryland .......................     24      23      3,491    3,149     39.4   32.3      2.5    2.9     36.0   29.2     22.7   22.0
Massachusetts ..................     43      54      7,288    7,696      8.8    7.2      1.0     .8     35.6   43.8     21.4   20.5
Michigan .......................    212     182     77,433   53,380     18.3   20.1      4.3    2.8     26.2   29.3     17.3   18.4
Minnesota ......................    120      73     21,625    8,109      4.0    4.8      6.5    3.9     19.0   26.4     16.1   18.2
Mississippi ....................     24      18      4,512    1,569     48.8   60.1      3.2     .5     38.9   40.3     14.4   20.3
Missouri .......................    101      75     17,713    8,417     11.8    9.8       .2     .3     34.1   40.2     18.8   18.9

Montana ........................     14       7      2,432      916        -     .1      3.3    2.5     14.1   13.6     18.5   26.5
Nebraska .......................      8     (2)        755      (2)      1.6    1.5      7.9   12.3     15.0   35.6     29.5   26.7
Nevada .........................     46      68     13,222   10,381      9.1    7.9     34.9   32.5     45.6   39.8     17.2   17.3
New Hampshire ..................    (2)       8        (2)    1,369      1.0     .4        -    4.1     18.2   41.0     33.0   25.5
New Jersey .....................     89     105     16,252   13,141     19.2   17.9      8.7   10.1     39.3   45.6     19.5   21.7
New Mexico .....................     17      14      2,805    2,418      2.6    2.2     50.2   39.0     28.8   19.5     17.5   16.0
New York .......................    147     148     31,866   21,500     10.8   11.7     10.3   13.9     33.2   35.7     18.1   18.7
North Carolina .................     32      78      5,619   12,979     33.0   36.4      6.5    7.4     33.6   40.1     20.8   17.1
North Dakota ...................     10       9      1,253      959      2.2    1.1      3.4    2.0     18.7    6.2     17.9    8.9
Ohio ...........................    189     155     45,092   21,735     10.5   12.0      3.4    3.2     26.3   32.4     17.3   17.7
Oklahoma .......................     21      29      4,443    4,885      7.0    8.4      6.2    7.7     27.2   24.6     15.3   16.0
Oregon .........................     73      69     19,492   15,510       .8    1.5     16.0   13.2     27.2   28.0     18.5   19.9
Pennsylvania ...................    205     216     40,987   33,824      5.0    4.5      3.9    4.0     25.7   28.1     21.7   24.0

Rhode Island ...................      6      10        615      978      1.8    3.1     21.3   14.3     19.8   48.7     25.0   32.1
South Carolina .................     47      31     12,440    5,841     59.3   45.3      1.1    1.1     42.7   41.9      7.7    7.5
South Dakota ...................      3       6        251      433       .4    4.4      2.0    1.8     31.1   18.0     21.9   15.9
Tennessee ......................     63      81      9,751    9,837     21.7   14.9       .1      -     36.9   40.0     19.7   17.6
Texas ..........................     79     139     19,488   23,174     17.4   16.1     40.0   34.9     27.8   29.0     13.5   14.0
Utah ...........................     18      27      3,714    3,983      1.4    1.9     15.6   15.8     25.9   34.4     10.7   12.7
Vermont ........................      7       9      1,096    1,177       .7     .3       .3     .2     23.8   31.9     20.9   27.3
Virginia .......................     14      12      1,699    2,521     27.1   26.8      6.0    2.1     35.2   33.4     22.5   19.1
Washington .....................     77      56     15,107   10,028      4.1    5.9     14.5    7.5     31.3   36.9     17.5   14.1
West Virginia ..................      7      14        890    2,410       .1     .5        -     .1     10.7   22.7     12.9   16.2
Wisconsin ......................     83      74     20,124   15,475      3.2    3.2      8.3    3.8     23.3   28.2     18.2   21.6
Wyoming ........................      3       4        268      273      1.5    2.2      1.1    7.3     32.8   15.0     34.0    9.2

Puerto Rico ....................     12      15      2,020    2,646       .2      -     98.5   99.2     48.0   59.1     14.9   10.3
                                                                                                                                   
    1 See footnote 1, table 1.
    2 Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.
    3 Data are not available.           
    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    NOTE: Dash represents zero.







Table 4. Census region and division: Extended mass layoff events, separations, and initial claimants for unemployment insurance, 
private nonfarm sector, selected quarters, 2008 and 2009

                                                                                                    Initial claimants for  
                                         Layoff events                   Separations                unemployment insurance 
   Census region and division                                                                                              
                                    I        IV         I           I        IV         I            I       IV        I   
                                  2008r     2008r     2009p       2008r     2008r     2009p        2008r    2008r    2009p 
                                                                                                                           
        United States(1) ......   1,340     3,585     3,489      230,098   642,154   558,909      259,292  762,737  542,023

Northeast .....................     217       517       591       32,643    90,853    89,285       38,963  101,840   84,848

    New England ...............      31        76       122        4,839    11,217    17,100        4,244   12,735   16,383
    Middle Atlantic ...........     186       441       469       27,804    79,636    72,185       34,719   89,105   68,465

South .........................     232       684       715       42,175   124,851   125,036       45,991  145,608  118,890

    South Atlantic ............     132       371       363       23,495    72,557    60,606       27,021   78,777   66,180
    East South Central ........      56       171       146       10,332    26,692    18,996        8,604   35,312   19,019
    West South Central ........      44       142       206        8,348    25,602    45,434       10,366   31,519   33,691

Midwest .......................     336     1,236       984       73,444   234,641   170,062       81,892  304,043  172,825

    East North Central ........     272       924       755       61,307   183,945   139,795       69,303  247,473  141,976
    West North Central ........      64       312       229       12,137    50,696    30,267       12,589   56,570   30,849

West ..........................     555     1,148     1,199       81,836   191,809   174,526       92,446  211,246  165,460

    Mountain ..................      49       210       213        7,547    40,530    34,215        6,744   40,591   30,627
    Pacific ...................     506       938       986       74,289   151,279   140,311       85,702  170,655  134,833
                                                                                                                           
 
    1 See footnote 1, table 1.
    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    NOTE: The States (including the District of Columbia) that comprise the census divisions are:  New England:
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont; Middle Atlantic:  New Jersey, New York, and
Pennsylvania; South Atlantic:  Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Virginia, and West Virginia; East South Central:  Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee; West South Central:
Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas; East North Central:  Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin; West
North Central:  Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; Mountain:  Arizona, Colorado,
Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming; and Pacific:  Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. 







Table 5. State distribution: Extended mass layoff events, separations, and initial claimants for unemployment insurance,
private nonfarm sector, selected quarters, 2008 and 2009

                                                                                                        Initial claimants for   
                                           Layoff events                     Separations                unemployment insurance  
              State                                                                                                             
                                       I        IV         I           I        IV         I            I        IV         I   
                                     2008r     2008r     2009p       2008r     2008r     2009p        2008r     2008r     2009p 
                                                                                                                                
    Total, private nonfarm(1) ..     1,340     3,585     3,489      230,098   642,154   558,909      259,292   762,737   542,023

Alabama ........................        13        17        21        2,182     5,086     5,010        2,825     8,447     4,149
Alaska .........................       (2)        12         7          (2)     3,345     2,110          (2)     2,363     1,120
Arizona ........................         5        30        36          474     6,365     5,825          607     5,611     5,123
Arkansas .......................        10        20         9        1,809     3,164     1,471        3,221     3,159     1,658
California .....................       467       766       842       66,895   118,069   115,014       78,098   132,375   107,072
Colorado .......................         9        31        33        2,141     5,384     5,339        1,480     4,142     4,317
Connecticut ....................         3        11        30          296     2,208     4,127          441     2,278     3,684
Delaware .......................         -         7         7            -       976     1,509            -       973     1,332
District of Columbia ...........         3       (2)       (2)          340       (2)       (2)          185       (2)       (2)
Florida ........................        60       180       137       10,358    42,118    27,109        8,531    37,472    26,389
Georgia ........................        19        59        59        2,112     8,373     7,124        8,376    16,008    11,381
Hawaii .........................         6        10        12        2,009     1,233     1,034          659     1,318     1,103
Idaho ..........................         8        51        24          783     7,791     3,248          940     8,397     3,216

Illinois .......................        98       286       240       17,736    55,805    41,887       17,169    60,441    36,253
Indiana ........................        26       154       104        4,396    22,553    13,057        7,467    44,383    15,133
Iowa ...........................        10        45        36        1,458     5,828     4,288        3,445    10,735     9,270
Kansas .........................         7        25        27        1,389     3,857     4,625        1,619     4,238     3,009
Kentucky .......................        18        67        26        2,049     9,742     2,970        1,886    12,602     3,464
Louisiana ......................        11        22        29        2,100     4,586     5,720        2,641     4,429     3,974
Maine ..........................       (2)         7        11          (2)     1,040     2,579          (2)     1,249     1,479
Maryland .......................        10        24        23        1,255     3,274     2,949        1,210     3,491     3,149
Massachusetts ..................        18        43        54        2,771     6,237     6,934        2,633     7,288     7,696
Michigan .......................        57       212       182       14,917    47,580    46,817       20,859    77,433    53,380
Minnesota ......................        16       120        73        2,107    20,893    10,133        1,694    21,625     8,109
Mississippi ....................         9        24        18        2,207     4,343     1,755          796     4,512     1,569
Missouri .......................        26       101        75        6,326    17,613     9,386        5,076    17,713     8,417

Montana ........................         5        14         7          442     1,775       899          440     2,432       916
Nebraska .......................         4         8       (2)          607     1,015       (2)          565       755       (2)
Nevada .........................        11        46        68        1,708     9,438    10,390        1,791    13,222    10,381
New Hampshire ..................       (2)       (2)         8          (2)       (2)     1,292          (2)       (2)     1,369
New Jersey .....................        33        89       105        6,676    16,438    16,054        5,657    16,252    13,141
New Mexico .....................         5        17        14          649     2,729     3,388          799     2,805     2,418
New York .......................        78       147       148       13,084    30,580    23,958       12,880    31,866    21,500
North Carolina .................        13        32        78        2,116     3,704     9,916        3,147     5,619    12,979
North Dakota ...................         -        10         9            -     1,253       959            -     1,253       959
Ohio ...........................        64       189       155       18,236    39,950    23,813       16,706    45,092    21,735
Oklahoma .......................       (2)        21        29          (2)     3,846     5,238          (2)     4,443     4,885
Oregon .........................        11        73        69        1,913    13,668    11,757        3,658    19,492    15,510
Pennsylvania ...................        75       205       216        8,044    32,618    32,173       16,182    40,987    33,824

Rhode Island ...................         4         6        10          363       612       963          345       615       978
South Carolina .................         9        47        31        1,125    10,908     5,065          978    12,440     5,841
South Dakota ...................       (2)         3         6          (2)       237       706          (2)       251       433
Tennessee ......................        16        63        81        3,894     7,521     9,261        3,097     9,751     9,837
Texas ..........................        22        79       139        4,298    14,006    33,005        4,363    19,488    23,174
Utah ...........................         5        18        27        1,150     3,704     4,540          608     3,714     3,983
Vermont ........................       (2)         7         9          (2)       825     1,205          (2)     1,096     1,177
Virginia .......................        14        14        12        5,384     2,104     2,900        3,882     1,699     2,521
Washington .....................        21        77        56        2,772    14,964    10,396        3,072    15,107    10,028
West Virginia ..................         4         7        14          805       915     3,856          712       890     2,410
Wisconsin ......................        27        83        74        6,022    18,057    14,221        7,102    20,124    15,475
Wyoming ........................       (2)         3         4          (2)     3,344       586          (2)       268       273

Puerto Rico ....................        10        12        15          659     1,304     1,683        2,315     2,020     2,646
                                                                                                                                
    1 See footnote 1, table 1.
    2 Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.
    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    NOTE: Dash represents zero. 







Table 6. Information technology-producing industries: Extended mass layoff events and separations, private nonfarm sector, 2002-2009

                                                               Information technology-producing industries(1)                     
                        Total extended                                                                                            
        Year             mass layoffs                                                                                             
                                                 Computer              Software and          Communications        Communications 
                                                hardware(2)         computer services(3)       equipment(4)          services(5)  

                     Layoff                 Layoff                  Layoff                 Layoff                Layoff           
                     events    Separations  events   Separations    events   Separations   events  Separations   events  Separations
        2002                                                                                                                      

First quarter ....    1,611      299,266       84       18,574        34         3,770       32        8,192       28        4,346
Second quarter ...    1,624      344,606       69       11,764        39         4,326       27        4,870       34        5,643
Third quarter ....    1,186      255,152       76       15,017        36         4,359       34        6,529       33        5,496
Fourth quarter ...    1,916      373,307       74       14,298        26         5,709       19        3,645       31        7,643

    Total ........    6,337    1,272,331      303       59,653       135        18,164      112       23,236      126       23,128

        2003                                                                                                                      

First quarter ....    1,502      286,947       71       11,900        27         5,097       23        4,402       26        4,513
Second quarter ...    1,799      368,273       54        9,221        19         2,741       21        3,098       22        4,169
Third quarter ....    1,190      236,333       46        6,488        24         4,189        9        1,289        8          842
Fourth quarter ...    1,690      325,333       25        5,080         8         1,167        9        1,619       23        5,774

    Total ........    6,181    1,216,886      196       32,689        78        13,194       62       10,408       79       15,298

        2004                                                                                                                      

First quarter ....    1,339      276,503       27        3,222        13         2,786        8          894       14        2,832
Second quarter ...    1,358      278,831       18        2,959        15         2,775        -            -       15        3,250
Third quarter ....      886      164,608       13        2,288        14         1,467        4          430       11        3,792
Fourth quarter ...    1,427      273,967       18        3,055        10         1,547        4          563       20        3,143

    Total ........    5,010      993,909       76       11,524        52         8,575       16        1,887       60       13,017

        2005                                                                                                                      

First quarter ....    1,142      186,506       13        1,526         9         2,355        4          439       12        2,400
Second quarter ...    1,203      246,099       20        2,973        13         1,558        4          842        7        1,331
Third quarter ....    1,136      201,878       23        3,307         7         1,034      (2)          (2)        3          304
Fourth quarter ...    1,400      250,178       19        4,122         3           720      (2)          (2)        5          845

    Total ........    4,881      884,661       75       11,928        32         5,667       13        3,000       27        4,880

        2006                                                                                                                      

First quarter ....      963      183,089       12        1,159         6           744      (2)          (2)      (2)          (2)
Second quarter ...    1,353      295,964       10        3,294         7         1,564        8          988      (2)          (2)
Third quarter ....      929      160,254       14        3,544         6           487      (2)          (2)        8        1,222
Fourth quarter ...    1,640      296,662       12        4,039         4           708        5        1,482        8          947

    Total ........    4,885      935,969       48       12,036        23         3,503       19        3,753       23        3,406

        2007                                                                                                                      

First quarter ....    1,110      225,600       19        3,007         5           875        3          415        5          885
Second quarter ...    1,421      278,719       22        3,634         4           413        5          433        3          315
Third quarter ....    1,018      160,024       22        5,279         6         1,030        4          403        3          276
Fourth quarter ...    1,814      301,592        9        1,459         4           473        3          381        7          870

    Total ........    5,363      965,935       72       13,379        19         2,791       15        1,632       18        2,346

        2008                                                                                                                      

First quarter(r) .    1,340      230,098       19        3,040         9           987      (2)          (2)        3          329
Second quarter(r).    1,756      354,713       25        4,018         7           969      (2)          (2)       16        2,545
Third quarter(r) .    1,582      290,892       37        6,781        20         3,015        6        1,331       11        1,906
Fourth quarter(r).    3,585      642,154       58       10,289        18         1,995        8        1,131       18        2,657

    Total ........    8,263    1,517,857      139       24,128        54         6,966       18        3,147       48        7,437

        2009                                                                                                                      

First quarter(p) .    3,489      558,909      124       22,172        18         3,250       16        2,729       11        1,870
                                                                                                                                  
 
    1 Information technology-producing industries are defined in Digital Economy 2003, (U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics 
and Statistics Administration, 2003).  In the MLS program, however, computer and software merchant wholesalers and computer and
software stores are only included in the computer hardware industry.
    2 The industries included in this grouping, based on the 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), are:
semiconductor machinery manufacturing; office machinery manufacturing; electronic computer manufacturing; computer storage device
manufacturing; computer terminal manufacturing; other computer peripheral equipment mfg.; electron tube manufacturing; bare
printed circuit board manufacturing; semiconductors and related device mfg.; electronic capacitor manufacturing; electronic
resistor manufacturing; electronic coils, transformers, and inductors; electronic connector manufacturing; printed circuit
assembly manufacturing; other electronic component manufacturing; industrial process variable instruments; electricity and signal
testing instruments; analytical laboratory instrument mfg.; computer and software merchant wholesalers; and computer and software
stores.
    3 The industries included in this grouping, based on the 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), are:
software publishers; internet service providers; web search portals; data processing and related services; custom computer 
programming services; computer systems design services; computer facilities management services; other computer related services;
office equipment rental and leasing; and computer and office machine repair.
    4 The industries included in this grouping, based on the 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), are:
telephone apparatus manufacturing; audio and video equipment manufacturing; broadcast and wireless communications equip.; fiber
optic cable manufacturing; software reproducing; and magnetic and optical recording media mfg.
    5 The industries included in this grouping, based on the 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), are:
wired telecommunications carriers; cellular and other wireless carriers; telecommunications resellers; cable and other program
distribution; satellite telecommunications; other telecommunications; and communication equipment repair.
    6 Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.
    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    NOTE: Dash represents zero.







Table 7. Industry distribution: Extended mass layoff events and separations associated with the movement of work,
selected quarters, 2008 and 2009

                                                               Layoff events                            Separations           
                     Industry                                                                                                 
                                                         I          IV            I            I            IV             I  
                                                       2008        2008r        2009p        2008r         2008r         2009p
                                                                                                                              
      Total, private nonfarm(1) .................       59          118           77        13,314        20,376        12,736

    Mining ......................................        -            -          (2)             -             -           (2)
    Utilities ...................................        -            -            -             -             -             -
    Construction ................................        -          (2)            -             -           (2)             -
    Manufacturing ...............................       34           80           58         6,652        15,232         9,833
         Food ...................................      (2)            3          (2)           (2)           425           (2)
         Beverage and tobacco products ..........      (2)          (2)            -           (2)           (2)             -
         Textile mills ..........................      (2)          (2)            -           (2)           (2)             -
         Textile product mills ..................        -          (2)          (2)             -           (2)           (2)
         Apparel ................................      (2)          (2)            -           (2)           (2)             -
         Leather and allied products ............      (2)            -          (2)           (2)             -           (2)
         Wood products ..........................        3          (2)          (2)           390           (2)           (2)
         Paper ..................................      (2)            4          (2)           (2)           602           (2)
         Printing and related support activities       (2)          (2)          (2)           (2)           (2)           (2)
         Petroleum and coal products ............        -            -            -             -             -             -

         Chemicals ..............................      (2)            4          (2)           (2)         1,125           (2)
         Plastics and rubber products ...........      (2)            4          (2)           (2)           542           (2)
         Nonmetallic mineral products ...........        -          (2)          (2)             -           (2)           (2)
         Primary metals .........................      (2)            3            4           (2)         1,795           603
         Fabricated metal products ..............      (2)            6            3           (2)           752           255
         Machinery ..............................        -            5            4             -         1,118           464
         Computer and electronic products .......        5           10           12         1,195         1,534         2,958
         Electrical equipment and appliances ....      (2)            7            6           (2)           830           987
         Transportation equipment ...............        8           19           11         1,190         4,301         1,781
         Furniture and related products .........      (2)            3            3           (2)           456           647
         Miscellaneous manufacturing ............        -            3          (2)             -           509           (2)

    Wholesale trade .............................        3            7          (2)           210           804           (2)
    Retail trade ................................        4            6            3         1,166           682           532
    Transportation and warehousing ..............        3            4          (2)         1,724           686           (2)
    Information .................................      (2)            4            3           (2)           871           576
    Finance and insurance .......................        8            8          (2)         2,120           926           (2)
    Real estate and rental and leasing ..........        -            -            -             -             -             -
    Professional and technical services .........      (2)          (2)          (2)           (2)           (2)           (2)
    Management of companies and enterprises .....        -            -          (2)             -             -           (2)
    Administrative and waste services ...........      (2)            4          (2)           (2)           545           (2)
    Educational services ........................        -            -            -             -             -             -
    Health care and social assistance ...........      (2)          (2)            -           (2)           (2)             -
    Arts, entertainment, and recreation .........        -            -            -             -             -             -
    Accommodation and food services .............        -            -          (2)             -             -           (2)
    Other services, except public administration         -          (2)          (2)             -           (2)           (2)

    Unclassified ................................        -            -            -             -             -             -
                                                                                                                              

    1 See footnote 1, table 1.
    2 Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.
    r = revised. 
    p = preliminary.
    NOTE: Dash represents zero. 







Table 8. Reason for layoff: Extended mass layoff events and separations associated with the movement of work, 
selected quarters, 2008 and 2009

                                               Layoff events                                  Separations              


         Reason for layoff                I         IV          I                 I               IV                I  
                                        2008       2008r       2009p            2008r            2008r            2009p

   Total, private nonfarm(1) .....       59         118          77            13,314           20,376           12,736

Business demand ..................       16          36          38             4,902            6,080            5,345
  Contract cancellation ..........        -         (2)         (2)                 -              (2)              (2)
  Contract completion ............        -         (2)           -                 -              (2)                -
  Domestic competition ...........        -         (2)         (2)                 -              (2)              (2)
  Excess inventory/saturated 
    market .......................        -           -         (2)                 -                -              (2)
  Import competition .............        7          10         (2)             1,724            1,504              (2)
  Slack work/insufficient demand/
    non-seasonal business slowdown        9          22          30             3,178            4,227            3,813

Organizational changes ...........       22          49          19             3,654            8,960            2,654
  Business-ownership change ......        6           9         (2)             1,656            1,498              (2)
  Reorganization or restructuring 
    of company ...................       16          40         (2)             1,998            7,462              (2)

Financial issues .................       17          29          15             3,704            4,554            3,746
  Bankruptcy .....................        -         (2)           -                 -              (2)                -
  Cost control/cost cutting/
    increase profitability .......       10          25         (2)             1,706            3,392              (2)
  Financial difficulty ...........        7         (2)         (2)             1,998              (2)              (2)

Production specific ..............      (2)         (2)         (2)               (2)              (2)              (2)
  Automation/technological 
    advances .....................        -           -           -                 -                -                -
  Energy related .................        -           -           -                 -                -                -
  Governmental regulations/
    intervention .................        -         (2)           -                 -              (2)                -
  Labor dispute/contract 
    negotiations/strike ..........        -           -           -                 -                -                -
  Material or supply shortage ....      (2)           -           -               (2)                -                -
  Model changeover ...............        -         (2)           -                 -              (2)                -
  Plant or machine repair/
    maintenance ..................        -           -           -                 -                -                -
  Product line discontinued ......        -           -         (2)                 -                -              (2)

Disaster/safety ..................      (2)         (2)           -               (2)              (2)                -
  Hazardous work environment .....        -           -           -                 -                -                -
  Natural disaster (not weather 
    related) .....................        -           -           -                 -                -                -
  Non-natural disaster ...........      (2)           -           -               (2)                -                -
  Extreme weather-related event ..        -         (2)           -                 -              (2)                -

Other/miscellaneous ..............      (2)           -         (2)               (2)                -              (2)
  Other ..........................      (2)           -         (2)               (2)                -              (2)
  Data not provided: refusal .....        -           -           -                 -                -                -
  Data not provided: does not 
    know .........................        -           -           -                 -                -                -

    1 See footnote 1, table 1.
    2 Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.
    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    NOTE: Dash represents zero. 







Table 9. Census region and division: Extended mass layoff events and separations associated with the movement of work,
selected quarters, 2008 and 2009

                                       Layoff events                             Separations            
 Census region and division                                                                             
                                 I          IV           I             I             IV              I  
                               2008        2008r       2009p         2008r          2008r          2009p
                                                                                                        
        United States(1) ..     59          118          77         13,314         20,376         12,736

Northeast .................      6           13           7          1,381          1,828          1,091

    New England ...........    (2)            4           3            (2)            686            463
    Middle Atlantic .......    (2)            9           4            (2)          1,142            628

South .....................     26           29          16          4,878          4,917          3,362

    South Atlantic ........      8            9           7            947          1,220          1,343
    East South Central ....     11           12           5          2,237          1,650            521
    West South Central ....      7            8           4          1,694          2,047          1,498

Midwest ...................     14           48          38          3,388          9,534          5,549

    East North Central ....     11           33          27          2,378          6,652          4,189
    West North Central ....      3           15          11          1,010          2,882          1,360

West ......................     13           28          16          3,667          4,097          2,734

    Mountain ..............    (2)          (2)         (2)            (2)            (2)            (2)
    Pacific ...............    (2)          (2)         (2)            (2)            (2)            (2)
                                                                                                        
 
    1 See footnote 1, table 1.
    2 Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.
    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    NOTE: The States (including the District of Columbia) that comprise the census divisions are:  New
England:  Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont; Middle Atlantic:
New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; South Atlantic:  Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida,
Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia; East South Central:
Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee; West South Central:  Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and
Texas; East North Central:  Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin; West North Central:  Iowa,
Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; Mountain:  Arizona, Colorado,
Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming; and Pacific:  Alaska, California, Hawaii,
Oregon, and Washington. 







Table 10. Extended mass layoff events and separations, selected measures, selected quarters, 2008 and 2009

                                                  Layoff events                                Separations              
                Action                                                                                                  
                                            I          IV            I              I              IV               I   
                                          2008        2008r        2009p          2008r           2008r           2009p 
                                                                                                                        
Total, private nonfarm (1) .........     1,340        3,585        3,489         230,098         642,154         558,909

    Total, excluding seasonal                                                                                           
        and vacation events (2) ....     1,094        2,716        3,173         186,991         492,397         511,311

                                                                                                                        
        Total, movement of work (3)         59          118           77          13,314          20,376          12,736

                                                                                                                        
             Movement of work 
               actions .............        76          161          105            (4)             (4)             (4)
                  With separations 
                    reported .......        41          122           70           6,180          11,919           7,295
                  With separations 
                    unknown ........        35           39           35            (4)             (4)             (4)

    1 See footnote 1, table 1.
    2 The questions on movement of work were not asked of employers when the reason for layoff was either seasonal work
or vacation period.
    3 Movement of work can involve more than one action. 
    4 Data are not available.
    r = revised.
    p = preliminary. 







Table 11. Movement of work actions by type of separation where number of separations is known by employers,
selected quarters, 2008 and 2009

                                              Actions(1)                         Separations         
           Activities                                                                                
                                        I        IV          I               I        IV          I  
                                      2008      2008r      2009p           2008      2008r      2009p
                                                                                                     
With separations reported(2) ..        41        122         70           6,180     11,919      7,295

           By location                                                                               

  Out-of-country relocations ..        15         36         20           1,901      4,059      3,466
      Within company ..........        12         31         20           1,602      3,720      3,466
      Different company .......         3          5          -             299        339          -

  Domestic relocations ........        26         86         50           4,279      7,860      3,829
      Within company ..........        24         79         45           3,364      7,363      3,483
      Different company .......         2          7          5             915        497        346

  Unable to assign place of                                                                          
     relocation ...............         -          -          -               -          -          -

           By company                                                                                

  Within company ..............        36        110         65           4,966     11,083      6,949
      Domestic ................        24         79         45           3,364      7,363      3,483
      Out of country ..........        12         31         20           1,602      3,720      3,466
      Unable to assign ........         -          -          -               -          -          -

  Different company ...........         5         12          5           1,214        836        346
      Domestic ................         2          7          5             915        497        346
      Out of country ..........         3          5          -             299        339          -
      Unable to assign ........         -          -          -               -          -          -

                                                                                                     
 
    1 Only actions for which separations associated with the movement of work were reported are
shown.
    2 See footnote 1, table 1. 
    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.
    Note: Dash represents zero.






Last Modified Date: May 12, 2009
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