Economic News Release

Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries News Release

For release 10:00 a.m. 	(EDT) Thursday, August 22, 2013		                   			USDL-13-1699 
Technical information:	(202) 691-6170 - iifstaff@bls.gov - www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm
Media contact:		(202) 691-5902 - PressOffice@bls.gov

NATIONAL CENSUS OF FATAL OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES IN 2012
(PRELIMINARY RESULTS)

A preliminary total of 4,383 fatal work injuries were recorded in the United States in 2012, down from a revised count 
of 4,693 fatal work injuries in 2011, according to results from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) 
conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The 2012 total represents the second lowest preliminary total 
since CFOI was first conducted in 1992. The rate of fatal work injury for U.S. workers in 2012 was 
3.2 per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers, down from a rate of 3.5 per 100,000 in 2011.

Over the last 5 years, net increases to the preliminary count have ranged from 84 in 2011 to 211 in 2009. 
The revised 2011 figure represented a 2 percent increase over the preliminary total, while the 2009 figure was 
a 5 percent increase. Revised 2012 data from CFOI will be released in the late Spring of 2014. 

Key preliminary findings of the 2012 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries:

-	Fatal work injuries in the private construction sector increased 5 percent to 775 in 2012 from 738 in 2011. 
	Total hours worked in the private construction industry increased one percent in 2012. The increase in fatal 
	occupational injuries in 2012 follows five consecutive years of declining fatal injury counts in the 
	construction sector. Fatal construction injuries are down 37 percent since 2006. 
-	Since 2011, CFOI has identified whether fatally-injured workers were working as contractors at the time of 
	the fatal incident. In 2012, 708 decedents were identified as contractors, many of whom worked in construction 
	and transportation occupations.
-	Fatal work injuries declined among non-Hispanic white workers (down 10 percent) and Hispanic or Latino workers 
	(down 5 percent) in 2012. Fatal work injuries were higher among non-Hispanic black or African-American workers 
	and non-Hispanic Asian workers.
-	Fatal work injuries involving workers under 16 years of age nearly doubled, rising from 10 in 2011 to 
	19 in 2012—the highest total since 2005. Fatal work injuries in the other age groups declined in 2012. 
	Fatal work injuries among workers 55 years of age and older declined for the second straight year.
-	Work-related suicides declined 10 percent from 2011 totals, but violence accounted for about 17 percent 
	of all fatal work injuries in 2012.
-	Fatal work injuries in the private mining sector rose in 2012, led by an increase in fatal injuries to workers 
	in oil and gas extraction industries. Fatal work injuries in oil and gas extraction industries rose 23 percent 
	to 138 in 2012, reaching a new high for the series. 

Worker characteristics

The number of fatal work injuries involving non-Hispanic white workers declined 10 percent in 2012, but rose 
by 13 percent for non-Hispanic Asian workers. Despite the increase, Asian workers still recorded a lower rate of 
fatal injury than the rate for workers overall (1.8 per 100,000 FTE workers for non-Hispanic Asians versus 
3.2 per 100,000 FTE workers for workers overall).

Fatal work injuries among Hispanic or Latino workers dropped to 708 in 2012 from 749 in 2011, a decrease of 5 percent. 
Of the 708 fatal work injuries incurred by Hispanic or Latino workers, 454 (or 64 percent) involved foreign-born 
workers. Overall, there were 777 fatal work injuries involving foreign-born workers in 2012, of which the 
greatest share (299 or 38 percent) were born in Mexico.

Fatal work injuries increased for workers under 16 years of age, rising to 19 in 2012 from 10 in 2011, reaching 
its highest level since 2005. Fourteen of these young decedents were employed as agricultural workers. Fatal work 
injuries involving men fell from 4,308 in 2011 to 4,045 in 2012—the lowest total since the inception of the 
fatality census in 1992.

Fatal injuries to both wage and salary workers and self-employed workers declined in 2012.

For more detailed information on fatal injuries by worker characteristics, see the 2012 tables 
at www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm.

Type of incident

Transportation incidents accounted for more than 2 out of every 5 fatal work injuries in 2012. (See chart 1.) 
Of the 1,789 transportation-related fatal injuries, about 58 percent (1,044 cases) were roadway incidents involving 
motorized land vehicles. Nonroadway incidents, such as a tractor overturn in a farm field, accounted for another 
13 percent of the transportation-related fatal injuries. About 16 percent of fatal transportation incidents in 2012 
involved pedestrians who were struck by vehicles. Of the 283 fatal work injuries involving pedestrians struck 
by vehicles, 65 occurred in work zones. (Note that transportation counts presented in this release are expected 
to rise when updated 2012 data are released in Spring 2014 because key source documentation detailing specific 
transportation-related incidents has not yet been received.)

Fatal work injuries among those fatally injured in aircraft incidents in 2012 declined by 14 percent from 2011, 
accounting for 125 fatalities or about 7 percent of the transportation total.

Overall, 767 workers were killed as a result of violence and other injuries by persons or animals, including 
463 homicides and 225 suicides. The work-related suicide total for 2012 declined 10 percent from the 2011 total 
and the homicide total was also slightly lower. Shootings were the most frequent manner of death in both 
homicides (81 percent) and suicides (48 percent). Of the 338 fatal work injuries involving female workers, 
29 percent involved homicides.

Fatal falls, slips, or trips took the lives of 668 workers in 2012, down slightly from 2011. Falls to a lower level 
accounted for 544 or about 81 percent of those fatalities. In 2012, the height of the fall was reported in 437 of the 
fatal falls to a lower level. Of those cases, about one in four occurred after a fall of 10 feet or less. Another 
one-fourth of the fatal fall cases occurred from falls of over 30 feet.

While the total number of fatal work injuries involving contact with objects and equipment in 2012 remained about 
the same as in 2011, the number of workers fatally injured after being struck by objects or equipment increased by 
7 percent (to 509 fatal work injuries in 2012 from 476 in 2011). This total includes 233 workers struck by 
falling objects or equipment and 199 struck by powered vehicles or mobile equipment not in normal operation.

There were 142 multiple-fatality incidents in 2012 (incidents in which more than one worker was killed) 
in which 341 workers died.

For more detailed information on fatal injuries by incident, see the 2012 tables at www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm.

Industry

In the private sector, there were 3,945 fatal work injuries in 2012, down 6 percent to a new series low. Both 
goods-producing industries and service-providing industries showed declines.

Among goods-producing sectors, the number of fatal work injuries in the private construction sector increased 
5 percent in 2012. Total hours worked were higher by one percent in 2012. The increase in 2012 was the first 
in construction fatalities since 2006. Construction fatalities are down 37 percent over that time. Construction 
accounted for the highest number of fatal work injuries of any industry sector in 2012. (See chart 2.)

Fatal work injuries in the private mining sector increased 14 percent to 177 in 2012 from 155 in 2011—the highest 
level since 2007. The number of fatal work injury cases in oil and gas extraction industries rose to 138 in 2012 
from 112 in 2011; the 2012 figure represents a series high. Fatal work injuries in coal mining increased slightly, 
and fatal work injuries in support activities for mining increased 9 percent. CFOI has used the North American 
Industry Classification System (NAICS) to define industry since 2003, and data on oil and gas extraction industries 
in CFOI comprise NAICS 21111 Oil and gas extraction, NAICS 213111 Drilling oil and gas wells, and 
NAICS 213112 Support activities for oil and gas operations.

Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting fatalities decreased 16 percent to 475 in 2012 from 566 in 2011. 
This follows a 9 percent drop in agriculture fatalities in 2011. Fatal injuries in the crop production, 
animal production, forestry and logging, and fishing sectors were all lower in 2012. Despite the declines in 
fatal work injuries in this sector over the last two years, agriculture recorded the highest fatal injury rate 
of any industry sector at 21.2 fatal injuries per 100,000 FTE workers in 2012.

Among service-providing industries in the private sector, fatal work injuries in transportation and warehousing 
accounted for 677 fatal work injuries in 2012, a decrease of 10 percent over the revised 2011 count (749 fatalities). 
The number of fatal injuries in truck transportation, the largest subsector within transportation and warehousing 
in terms of employment, decreased 6 percent in 2012. (As noted, transportation counts presented in this release 
are expected to rise when updated 2012 data are released in Spring 2014.) Among other transportation subsectors, 
fatal work injuries in air transportation were slightly higher, but fatalities in water and rail transportation 
were lower in 2012.

Fatal work injuries in the financial activities sector declined 17 percent in 2012 to 81. The professional and 
business services sector also reported lower numbers of fatal injuries in 2012, down 10 percent from 2011.

Fatal occupational injuries among government workers decreased 13 percent from 2011 to 438 fatal work injuries, 
the lowest fatal work injury total since the start of the fatality census. Both state government and 
local government showed declines (19 percent and 16 percent, respectively), though fatal injuries among 
federal government workers remained about the same.

For more detailed information on fatal injuries by industry, see the 2012 tables at www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm.

Occupation

Fatal work injuries in construction and extraction occupations rose for the second year in a row to 838—a 5 percent 
increase from 2011. Hours worked increased one percent in this occupation group during that period. Fatal injuries 
among construction trades workers rose in 2012 to 577 after 5 years of decline. This marked an 8 percent increase 
over the series low of 533 in 2011, but a 41 percent drop from the high of 977 reported in 2006. Fatal work injuries 
to construction laborers, the subgroup in this category with the highest number of fatalities, increased 10 percent 
to 210 in 2012, following a series low of 191 in 2011. Fatal injuries to roofers, another subgroup within 
construction trades workers, rose to 70 in 2012, a 17 percent rise from 2011 marking the highest count in 5 years.
 
Fatal work injuries in transportation and material moving occupations were down 7 percent to 1,150 in 2012. 
Fatal work injuries in this occupational group accounted for about one quarter of all fatal occupational injuries. 
Drivers/sales workers and truck drivers was the subgroup within transportation and material moving occupations with 
the highest number of fatal injuries. Dropping 4 percent, this subgroup recorded 741 fatalities in 2012. Fatal 
injuries to taxi drivers and chauffeurs were down 28 percent to a series low of 46. (As noted, transportation and 
material moving counts presented in this release are expected to rise when updated 2012 data are released 
in Spring 2014.)

The number of fatal work injuries among protective service occupations decreased 21 percent in 2012 
to 224 fatalities–reaching the lowest count since the occupational series began in 2003. The decline was led 
by lower numbers of fatal injuries to police and sheriff’s patrol officers, which dropped 20 percent to 104 in 2012 
to continue a two-year downward trend. Fatal injuries to both security guards and firefighters reached series lows 
with 48 and 17 fatalities, respectively.

Fatal work injuries to workers in management occupations declined 8 percent to 429 in 2012—the lowest level 
in the series. This decrease was driven primarily by the 19 percent decline in fatal injuries to farmers, ranchers, 
and other agricultural managers from 268 in 2011 to 216 in 2012.

Fatalities among farming, fishing, and forestry occupations declined 6 percent to 245 in 2012. This was led by the 
24 percent drop in fatalities to fishers and related fishing workers from 42 in 2011 to a series low of 32 in 2012. 
Fatal injuries to logging workers have remained somewhat level for the last three years, decreasing slightly 
to 62 in 2012.

Fatal injuries to resident military personnel reached a series low in 2012, dropping 25 percent from 
57 fatalities in 2011 to 43.

For more detailed information on fatal injuries by occupation, see the 2012 tables at www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm.

Contract workers

In addition to identifying the industry in which a decedent was employed, CFOI began in 2011 to identify whether 
a worker was a contractor. A contractor is defined as a worker employed by one firm but working at the behest of 
another firm that exercises overall responsibility for the operations at the site where the decedent was 
fatally injured. This information helps to identify the location and type of work being performed when 
the fatal work injury occurred.

In 2012, the number of fatal occupational injuries incurred by contractors was 708, or 16 percent of all 
fatal injuries, compared to 542 reported in 2011. Falls to a lower level accounted for 30 percent of contractor 
deaths while struck by object or equipment (18 percent) and pedestrian vehicular (11 percent) incidents also were 
frequent events among contractors.

Fatally-injured contractors were most often contracted by a government entity (151 or 21 percent of all contractors) 
and by firms in the private construction (133 or 19 percent); mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction 
(68 or 10 percent); and manufacturing (67 or 9 percent) industry sectors.

The majority of contractors (381 or 54 percent) were working in construction and extraction occupations when fatally 
injured. Decedents in this occupation group were most often employed as construction laborers (101), first-line 
supervisors of construction trades and extraction workers (42), electricians (39), and roofers (32). Among contractors 
who were employed outside the construction and extraction occupations group, the largest number of fatal occupational 
injuries was incurred by heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers (50); tree trimmers and pruners (16); 
security guards (15); landscaping and groundskeeping workers (14); welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers (14); 
and athletes and sports competitors (13).

For more detailed information on fatal injuries incurred by contract workers, see the 2012 charts 
at www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm.

State and metropolitan statistical area (MSA)

Sixteen states and the District of Columbia reported higher numbers of fatal work injuries in 2012 than in 2011, 
while 32 states reported lower numbers. Two states reported the same number as in 2011. For more detailed state 
results, contact the individual state agency responsible for the collection of CFOI data in that state. Although 
data for Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam are not included in the national totals for this release, 
results for these jurisdictions are available. Participating agencies and their telephone numbers are listed 
in Table 6.

Counts for over 300 MSAs are also available for 2012 from CFOI and detailed data are available for more than 50 MSAs. 
The MSAs with the most fatal occupational injuries in 2012 were New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island (NY-NJ-PA) 
with 178, Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown (TX) with 90, Chicago-Joliet-Naperville (IL-IN-WI) with 81, and Los Angeles-Long 
Beach-Santa Ana (CA) with 81.

For more detailed information on fatal injuries by state and MSA, see the 2012 tables at www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm.

Background of the program

The Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), part of the BLS Occupational Safety and Health Statistics (OSHS) 
program, compiles a count of all fatal work injuries occurring in the U.S. during the calendar year. The CFOI program 
uses diverse state, federal, and independent data sources to identify, verify, and describe fatal work injuries. 
This assures counts are as complete and accurate as possible. For the 2012 data, over 19,000 unique source documents 
were reviewed as part of the data collection process.

The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII), another component of the OSHS program, presents frequency 
counts and incidence rates by industry and also by detailed case circumstances and worker characteristics for 
nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses for cases that result in days away from work. Incidence rates for 2012 
by industry and case type will be published in October 2013, and information on 2012 case circumstances and worker 
characteristics will be available in November 2013. For additional data, access the 
BLS Internet site: www.bls.gov/iif/. For technical information and definitions for the CFOI program, 
please go to the BLS Handbook of Methods on the BLS website at www.bls.gov/opub/hom/pdf/homch9.pdf.







     Table 1.  Fatal occupational injuries by event or exposure, 2011-2012
     ___________________________________________________________________________
                                                  |         |                   
                                                  | 2011(2) |       2012p       
                 Event or exposure(1)             |_________|___________________
                                                  |                   |         
                                                  |       Number      | Percent 
     _____________________________________________|___________________|_________
                                                  |         |         |         
       Total......................................|  4,693  |  4,383  |    100  
                                                  |         |         |         
     Violence and other injuries by persons or    |         |         |         
      animals.....................................|    791  |    767  |     17  
       Homicides - intentional injury by other    |         |         |         
        person....................................|    468  |    463  |     11  
         Shooting by other person - intentional...|    365  |    375  |      9  
         Stabbing, cutting, slashing, piercing....|     42  |     32  |      1  
       Self-inflicted injury - intentional........|    250  |    225  |      5  
                                                  |         |         |         
     Transportation incidents.....................|  1,937  |  1,789  |     41  
       Roadway incidents involving motorized land |         |         |         
        vehicle...................................|  1,103  |  1,044  |     24  
         Roadway collision with other vehicle.....|    525  |    512  |     12  
           Roadway collision - moving in same     |         |         |         
            direction.............................|    150  |    110  |      3  
           Roadway collision - moving in opposite |         |         |         
            directions, oncoming..................|    172  |    186  |      4  
           Roadway collision - moving             |         |         |         
            perpendicularly.......................|    111  |    124  |      3  
         Roadway collision with object other than |         |         |         
          vehicle.................................|    313  |    300  |      7  
           Vehicle struck object or animal on side|         |         |         
            of roadway............................|    292  |    282  |      6  
         Roadway noncollision incident............|    262  |    228  |      5  
           Jack-knifed or overturned, roadway.....|    208  |    187  |      4  
       Nonroadway incidents involving motorized   |         |         |         
        land vehicles.............................|    222  |    227  |      5  
           Jack-knifed or overturned, nonroadway..|    113  |    111  |      3  
       Pedestrian vehicular incident..............|    316  |    283  |      6  
         Pedestrian struck by vehicle in work zone|     63  |     65  |      1  
       Rail vehicle incidents.....................|     50  |     33  |      1  
       Water vehicle incidents....................|     72  |     64  |      1  
       Aircraft incidents.........................|    145  |    125  |      3  
                                                  |         |         |         
     Fires and explosions.........................|    144  |    116  |      3  
                                                  |         |         |         
     Falls, slips, trips..........................|    681  |    668  |     15  
       Falls to lower level.......................|    553  |    544  |     12  
         Fall from collapsing structure or        |         |         |         
          equipment...............................|     38  |     35  |      1  
         Fall through surface or existing opening |     60  |     71  |      2  
       Fall on same level.........................|    111  |    108  |      2  
                                                  |         |         |         
     Exposure to harmful substances or            |         |         |         
      environments................................|    419  |    320  |      7  
       Exposure to electricity....................|    174  |    156  |      4  
       Exposure to temperature extremes...........|     63  |     40  |      1  
       Exposure to other harmful substances.......|    144  |     94  |      2  
         Inhalation of harmful substance..........|     57  |     40  |      1  
                                                  |         |         |         
     Contact with objects and equipment...........|    710  |    712  |     16  
       Struck by object or equipment..............|    476  |    509  |     12  
         Struck by falling object or equipment -  |         |         |         
          other than powered vehicle..............|    219  |    233  |      5  
         Struck by discharged or flying object....|     24  |     27  |      1  
       Caught in or compressed by equipment or    |         |         |         
        objects...................................|    145  |    122  |      3  
         Caught in running equipment or machinery |    118  |     92  |      2  
       Struck, caught, or crushed in collapsing   |         |         |         
        structure, equipment, or material.........|     84  |     74  |      2  
     _____________________________________________|_________|_________|_________

       1 Based on the BLS Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System
     (OIICS) 2.01 implemented for 2011 data forward.
       2 Totals for 2011 are revised and final.  The BLS news release issued
     September 20, 2012, reported a total of 4,609 fatal work injuries for
     calendar year 2011.  Since then, an additional 84 job-related fatal
     injuries were identified, bringing the total job-related fatal injury count
     for 2011 to 4,693.
       p Data for 2012 are preliminary.  Revised and final 2012 data are
     scheduled to be released in Spring 2014.
       NOTE: Totals for major categories may include subcategories not shown
     separately.  Percentages may not add to totals because of rounding.  CFOI
     fatality counts exclude illness-related deaths unless precipitated by an
     injury event.
       SOURCE:  U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, in
     cooperation with State, New York City, District of Columbia, and Federal
     agencies, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries






     Table 2.  Fatal occupational injuries by industry and selected event or exposure, 2012p
     ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
                                             |                       |                                               
                                             |     Fatal injuries    |         Selected event or exposure(2)         
                                             |                       |        (percent of total for industry)        
                                             |_______________________|_______________________________________________
                   Industry(1)               |           |           |           |           |           |           
                                             |           |           |           |           |   Falls,  | Struck by 
                                             |   Number  |  Percent  | Homicides | Roadway(3)|   slips,  | object or 
                                             |           |           |           |           |   trips   | equipment 
     ________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________
                                             |           |           |           |           |           |           
         Total...............................|   4,383   |     100   |      11   |      24   |      15   |      12   
                                             |           |           |           |           |           |           
      Private industry.......................|   3,945   |      90   |      10   |      24   |      16   |      12   
                                             |           |           |           |           |           |           
       Goods producing.......................|   1,741   |      40   |       1   |      15   |      21   |      17   
                                             |           |           |           |           |           |           
        Natural resources and mining.........|     652   |      15   |     –     |      17   |       8   |      23   
         Agriculture, forestry, fishing and  |           |           |           |           |           |           
          hunting............................|     475   |      11   |     –     |      12   |       7   |      25   
           Crop production...................|     204   |       5   |     –     |      13   |       5   |      23   
           Animal production.................|     141   |       3   |     –     |      16   |       9   |      16   
           Forestry and logging..............|      62   |       1   |     –     |     –     |       5   |      74   
         Mining(4)...........................|     177   |       4   |     –     |      30   |      13   |      18   
           Mining, except oil and gas........|      38   |       1   |     –     |       8   |      13   |      24   
           Support activities for mining.....|     114   |       3   |     –     |      38   |      11   |      16   
        Construction.........................|     775   |      18   |       1   |      14   |      36   |      10   
         Construction........................|     775   |      18   |       1   |      14   |      36   |      10   
           Construction of buildings.........|     133   |       3   |       2   |       9   |      50   |       8   
           Heavy and civil engineering       |           |           |           |           |           |           
            construction.....................|     169   |       4   |     –     |      25   |      11   |      15   
           Specialty trade contractors.......|     456   |      10   |    (5)    |      11   |      41   |       9   
        Manufacturing........................|     314   |       7   |       6   |      15   |      12   |      19   
         Manufacturing.......................|     314   |       7   |       6   |      15   |      12   |      19   
           Food manufacturing................|      41   |       1   |      10   |      24   |      17   |      10   
           Fabricated metal product          |           |           |           |           |           |           
            manufacturing....................|      43   |       1   |       2   |     –     |       7   |      33   
                                             |           |           |           |           |           |           
       Service providing.....................|   2,204   |      50   |      16   |      30   |      12   |       9   
                                             |           |           |           |           |           |           
        Trade, transportation, and utilities |   1,152   |      26   |      14   |      42   |       9   |       8   
         Wholesale trade.....................|     191   |       4   |       6   |      34   |      15   |      17   
           Merchant wholesalers, durable     |           |           |           |           |           |           
            goods............................|     103   |       2   |       8   |      32   |      13   |      22   
           Merchant wholesalers, nondurable  |           |           |           |           |           |           
            goods............................|      83   |       2   |     –     |      35   |      18   |      11   
         Retail trade........................|     262   |       6   |      40   |      18   |      15   |       7   
           Motor vehicle and parts dealers...|      43   |       1   |      23   |      23   |     –     |      12   
           Food and beverage stores..........|      63   |       1   |      65   |       6   |      11   |       2   
         Transportation and warehousing......|     677   |      15   |       7   |      54   |       5   |       6   
           Truck transportation..............|     456   |      10   |       1   |      71   |       4   |       6   
           Transit and ground passenger      |           |           |           |           |           |           
            transportation...................|      54   |       1   |      63   |      26   |     –     |     –     
         Utilities...........................|      22   |       1   |     –     |      23   |     –     |      18   
        Information..........................|      38   |       1   |      13   |      47   |     –     |     –     
        Financial activities.................|      81   |       2   |      23   |      16   |      25   |       7   
         Finance and insurance...............|      20   |    (5)    |     –     |     –     |      30   |     –     
         Real estate and rental and leasing..|      61   |       1   |      26   |      18   |      23   |       8   
        Professional and business services...|     388   |       9   |       7   |      18   |      19   |      16   
         Professional and technical services |      54   |       1   |     –     |      28   |      17   |     –     
         Administrative and waste services...|     332   |       8   |       8   |      17   |      19   |      19   
        Educational and health services......|     139   |       3   |      15   |      22   |      14   |       2   
         Educational services................|      33   |       1   |     –     |     –     |      18   |     –     
         Health care and social assistance...|     106   |       2   |      18   |      28   |      13   |       3   
        Leisure and hospitality..............|     220   |       5   |      35   |      12   |      11   |       4   
         Arts, entertainment, and recreation |      78   |       2   |       8   |       9   |      14   |       8   
         Accommodation and food services.....|     142   |       3   |      50   |      13   |      10   |     –     
        Other services, except public        |           |           |           |           |           |           
         administration......................|     183   |       4   |      26   |      13   |       7   |      15   
                                             |           |           |           |           |           |           
      Government(6)..........................|     438   |      10   |      17   |      26   |      10   |       4   
                                             |           |           |           |           |           |           
       Federal government....................|      97   |       2   |       7   |      16   |       7   |     –     
       State government......................|      87   |       2   |      15   |      29   |      11   |       3   
       Local government......................|     250   |       6   |      22   |      30   |      10   |       5   
     ________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________

       1 Industry data are based on the North American Industry Classification System, 2007.
       2 Based on the BLS Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System (OIICS) 2.01 implemented for 2011
     data forward.  The figure shown is the percent of the total fatal injuries for that industry group.
       3 "Roadway" includes deaths to vehicle occupants resulting from traffic incidents that occur on the public
     roadway, shoulder, or surrounding area.  It excludes incidents occurring entirely off the roadway, such as in
     parking lots and on farms; incidents involving trains; and deaths to pedestrians or other nonpassengers.
       4 Includes fatal injuries at all establishments categorized as Mining (Sector 21) in the North American
     Industry Classification System, 2007, including establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health
     Administration (MSHA) rules and reporting, such as those in Oil and Gas Extraction.
       5 Less than or equal to 0.5 percent.
       6 Includes fatal injuries to workers employed by governmental organizations regardless of industry.
       p Data for 2012 are preliminary.  Revised and final 2012 data are scheduled to be released in Spring 2014.
      NOTE: Totals for major categories may include subcategories not shown separately.  Percentages may not add to
     totals because of rounding.  Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria. 
     CFOI fatality counts exclude illness-related deaths unless precipitated by an injury event.  There were three
     fatal injuries for which there was insufficient information to determine a specific industry classification.
       SOURCE:  U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, in cooperation with State, New York City,
     District of Columbia, and Federal agencies, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries






     Table 3.  Fatal occupational injuries by occupation and selected event or exposure, 2012p
     _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
                                                  |                       |                                               
                                                  |     Fatal injuries    |         Selected event or exposure(2)         
                                                  |                       |       (percent of total for occupation)       
                                                  |_______________________|_______________________________________________
                     Occupation(1)                |           |           |           |           |           |           
                                                  |           |           |           |           |   Falls,  | Struck by 
                                                  |   Number  |  Percent  | Homicides | Roadway(3)|   slips,  | object or 
                                                  |           |           |           |           |   trips   | equipment 
     _____________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________
                                                  |           |           |           |           |           |           
       Total......................................|   4,383   |     100   |      11   |      24   |      15   |      12   
                                                  |           |           |           |           |           |           
     Management occupations.......................|     429   |      10   |      13   |      13   |      11   |      13   
       Top executives.............................|      30   |       1   |      10   |      33   |     –     |     –     
       Operations specialties managers............|      23   |       1   |      13   |      26   |     –     |     –     
       Other management occupations...............|     365   |       8   |      13   |      10   |      12   |      15   
     Business and financial operations occupations|      22   |       1   |      18   |      45   |      14   |     –     
     Computer and mathematical occupations........|       8   |    (4)    |      12   |     –     |     –     |     –     
     Architecture and engineering occupations.....|      33   |       1   |     –     |      33   |      12   |       9   
       Engineers..................................|      22   |       1   |     –     |      32   |     –     |     –     
     Life, physical, and social science           |           |           |           |           |           |           
      occupations.................................|      19   |    (4)    |      11   |      32   |     –     |     –     
     Community and social services occupations....|      37   |       1   |      38   |      22   |     –     |     –     
     Legal occupations............................|       8   |    (4)    |     –     |     –     |     –     |     –     
     Education, training, and library occupations |      24   |       1   |     –     |     –     |      25   |     –     
     Arts, design, entertainment, sports, and     |           |           |           |           |           |           
      media occupations...........................|      44   |       1   |      11   |       7   |      16   |     –     
       Entertainers and performers, sports and    |           |           |           |           |           |           
        related workers...........................|      27   |       1   |     –     |     –     |     –     |     –     
     Healthcare practitioners and technical       |           |           |           |           |           |           
      occupations.................................|      49   |       1   |     –     |      31   |      14   |     –     
       Health diagnosing and treating             |           |           |           |           |           |           
        practitioners.............................|      29   |       1   |     –     |      17   |      14   |     –     
       Health technologists and technicians.......|      17   |    (4)    |     –     |      59   |     –     |     –     
     Healthcare support occupations...............|      10   |    (4)    |     –     |      40   |      30   |     –     
     Protective service occupations...............|     224   |       5   |      40   |      22   |       4   |       3   
       Fire fighting and prevention workers.......|      18   |    (4)    |      11   |      33   |       6   |     –     
       Law enforcement workers....................|     119   |       3   |      41   |      29   |       3   |     –     
       Other protective service workers...........|      68   |       2   |      49   |       6   |       7   |     –     
     Food preparation and serving related         |           |           |           |           |           |           
      occupations.................................|      53   |       1   |      34   |      13   |      19   |     –     
       Supervisors, food preparation and serving  |           |           |           |           |           |           
        workers...................................|      14   |    (4)    |      50   |     –     |     –     |     –     
     Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance|           |           |           |           |           |           
      occupations.................................|     245   |       6   |       4   |      10   |      27   |      22   
       Building cleaning and pest control workers |      49   |       1   |      16   |      16   |      29   |     –     
       Grounds maintenance workers................|     156   |       4   |     –     |       8   |      28   |      29   
     Personal care and service occupations........|      64   |       1   |      33   |      14   |       8   |     –     
     Sales and related occupations................|     216   |       5   |      51   |      12   |      11   |       2   
       Supervisors, sales workers.................|     106   |       2   |      57   |       6   |       7   |       3   
       Retail sales workers.......................|      63   |       1   |      63   |       5   |      16   |     –     
       Sales representatives, services............|      10   |    (4)    |     –     |      30   |      30   |     –     
       Sales representatives, wholesale and       |           |           |           |           |           |           
        manufacturing.............................|      15   |    (4)    |     –     |      60   |     –     |     –     
     Office and administrative support occupations|      82   |       2   |      23   |      24   |      16   |       5   
       Material recording, scheduling,            |           |           |           |           |           |           
        dispatching, and distributing workers.....|      47   |       1   |      11   |      30   |      15   |       6   
     Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations...|     245   |       6   |     –     |      12   |       5   |      31   
       Agricultural workers.......................|     139   |       3   |     –     |      18   |       6   |      17   
       Fishing and hunting workers................|      34   |       1   |     –     |       3   |       6   |     –     
       Forest, conservation, and logging workers..|      64   |       1   |     –     |     –     |       5   |      75   
     Construction and extraction occupations......|     838   |      19   |       1   |      13   |      35   |      10   
       Supervisors, construction and extraction   |           |           |           |           |           |           
        workers...................................|     117   |       3   |       1   |      18   |      33   |      12   
       Construction trades workers................|     577   |      13   |       1   |      10   |      40   |       8   
       Extraction workers.........................|      86   |       2   |     –     |      26   |      15   |      22   
     Installation, maintenance, and repair        |           |           |           |           |           |           
      occupations.................................|     326   |       7   |       5   |      16   |      13   |      24   
       Vehicle and mobile equipment mechanics,    |           |           |           |           |           |           
        installers, and repairers.................|     104   |       2   |       6   |      12   |       3   |      46   
       Other installation, maintenance, and repair|           |           |           |           |           |           
        occupations...............................|     179   |       4   |       3   |      15   |      18   |      13   
     Production occupations.......................|     211   |       5   |       6   |       8   |      14   |      16   
       Supervisors, production workers............|      22   |       1   |     –     |     –     |     –     |     –     
       Metal workers and plastic workers..........|      82   |       2   |       4   |      11   |      12   |      18   
     Transportation and material moving           |           |           |           |           |           |           
      occupations.................................|   1,150   |      26   |       6   |      50   |       6   |       9   
       Air transportation workers.................|      71   |       2   |     –     |     –     |     –     |     –     
       Motor vehicle operators....................|     817   |      19   |       7   |      67   |       5   |       6   
       Water transportation workers...............|      13   |    (4)    |     –     |     –     |     –     |     –     
       Material moving workers....................|     207   |       5   |       4   |      12   |      14   |      21   
     Military occupations(5)......................|      43   |       1   |       7   |       7   |     –     |     –     
     _____________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________

       1 Occupation data are based on the Standard Occupational Classification system, 2010.
       2 Based on the BLS Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System (OIICS) 2.01 implemented for 2011 data
     forward.  The figure shown is the percent of the total fatal injuries for that occupation group.
       3 "Roadway" includes deaths to vehicle occupants resulting from traffic incidents that occur on the public roadway,
     shoulder, or surrounding area.  It excludes incidents occurring entirely off the roadway, such as in parking lots and
     on farms; incidents involving trains; and deaths to pedestrians or other non passengers.
       4 Less than or equal to 0.5 percent.
       5 Includes fatal injuries to persons identified as resident armed forces regardless of individual occupation
     listed.
       p Data for 2012 are preliminary.  Revised and final 2012 data are scheduled to be released in Spring 2014.
     NOTE: Totals for major categories may include subcategories not shown separately.  Percentages may not add to totals
     because of rounding.  Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.  CFOI fatality
     counts exclude illness-related deaths unless precipitated by an injury event.  There were three fatal injuries for
     which there was insufficient information to determine a specific occupation classification.
       SOURCE:  U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, in cooperation with State, New York City, District
     of Columbia, and Federal agencies, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries






     Table 4.  Fatal occupational injuries by selected worker characteristics and selected event or
     exposure, 2012p
     ______________________________________________________________________________________________________
                                   |                       |                                               
                                   |     Fatal injuries    |         Selected event or exposure(1)         
                                   |                       | (percent of total for characteristic category)
                                   |_______________________|_______________________________________________
             Characteristic        |           |           |           |           |           |           
                                   |           |           |           |           |   Falls,  | Struck by 
                                   |   Number  |  Percent  | Homicides | Roadway(2)|   slips,  | object or 
                                   |           |           |           |           |   trips   | equipment 
     ______________________________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________
                                   |           |           |           |           |           |           
     Total.........................|   4,383   |     100   |      11   |      24   |      15   |      12   
                                   |           |           |           |           |           |           
            Employee status        |           |           |           |           |           |           
                                   |           |           |           |           |           |           
     Wage and salary(3)............|   3,396   |      77   |      10   |      27   |      15   |      11   
     Self-employed(4)..............|     987   |      23   |      14   |      13   |      16   |      15   
                                   |           |           |           |           |           |           
                 Gender            |           |           |           |           |           |           
                                   |           |           |           |           |           |           
     Men...........................|   4,045   |      92   |       9   |      24   |      15   |      12   
     Women.........................|     338   |       8   |      29   |      21   |      16   |       4   
                                   |           |           |           |           |           |           
                 Age(5)            |           |           |           |           |           |           
                                   |           |           |           |           |           |           
     Under 16 years................|      19   |    (6)    |     –     |       5   |     –     |      16   
     16-17 years...................|       9   |    (6)    |     –     |      33   |      11   |     –     
     18-19 years...................|      58   |       1   |      12   |      24   |      12   |      12   
     20-24 years...................|     275   |       6   |      11   |      25   |       7   |      11   
     25-34 years...................|     703   |      16   |      14   |      23   |      11   |       9   
     35-44 years...................|     792   |      18   |      12   |      25   |      13   |      11   
     45-54 years...................|   1,102   |      25   |      10   |      25   |      17   |      10   
     55-64 years...................|     869   |      20   |       9   |      23   |      17   |      13   
     65 years and over.............|     552   |      13   |       6   |      22   |      23   |      16   
                                   |           |           |           |           |           |           
        Race or ethnic origin(7)   |           |           |           |           |           |           
                                   |           |           |           |           |           |           
     White, non-Hispanic...........|   3,002   |      68   |       8   |      25   |      15   |      12   
     Black or African-American,    |           |           |           |           |           |           
      non-Hispanic.................|     446   |      10   |      22   |      26   |       9   |       9   
     Hispanic or Latino............|     708   |      16   |       9   |      22   |      21   |      14   
     American Indian or Alaska     |           |           |           |           |           |           
      Native, non-Hispanic.........|      34   |       1   |     –     |      15   |       9   |      15   
     Asian, non-Hispanic...........|     137   |       3   |      36   |      12   |      18   |       5   
     Native Hawaiian or Pacific    |           |           |           |           |           |           
      Islander, non-Hispanic.......|       7   |    (6)    |     –     |     –     |     –     |     –     
     Multiple races, non-Hispanic..|       5   |    (6)    |      20   |     –     |     –     |     –     
     Other or not reported,        |           |           |           |           |           |           
      non-Hispanic.................|      44   |       1   |      20   |      23   |      14   |     –     
     ______________________________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________

       1 Based on the BLS Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System (OIICS) 2.01 implemented
     for 2011 data forward.  The figure shown is the percent of the total fatal injuries for that
     demographic characteristic.
       2 "Roadway" includes deaths to vehicle occupants resulting from traffic incidents that occur on the
     public roadway, shoulder, or surrounding area.  It excludes incidents occurring entirely off the
     roadway, such as in parking lots and on farms; incidents involving trains; and deaths to pedestrians
     or other nonpassengers.
       3 May include volunteers and workers receiving other types of compensation.               
       4 Includes self-employed workers, owners of unincorporated businesses and farms, paid and unpaid
     family workers, and may include some owners of incorporated businesses or members of partnerships.
       5 There were four fatal injuries for which there was insufficient information to determine the age
     of the decedent. 
       6 Less than or equal to 0.5 percent.
       7 Persons identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race.  The race categories shown exclude
     Hispanic and Latino workers.
       p Data for 2012 are preliminary.  Revised and final 2012 data are scheduled to be released in Spring
     2014.
       NOTE: Totals for major categories may include subcategories not shown separately.  Percentages may
     not add to totals because of rounding.  Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet
     publication criteria.  CFOI fatality counts exclude illness-related deaths unless precipitated by an
     injury event.
       SOURCE:  U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, in cooperation with State, New York
     City, District of Columbia, and Federal agencies, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries






     Table 5.  Fatal occupational injuries by state and event or exposure, 2011-2012
     __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
                               |                       |                                                                       
                               |Total fatal injuries(1)|                          Event or exposure(4)                         
                               |                       |                                  2012                                 
                               |_______________________|_______________________________________________________________________
                               |           |           |           |           |           |           |           |           
          State of injury      |           |           |  Violence |           |           |           |Exposure to|           
                               |           |           | and other | Transpor- |           |   Falls,  |  harmful  |  Contact  
                               |  2011(2)  |  2012(3)p |injuries by|   tation  | Fires and |   slips,  | substances|    with   
                               | (revised) |           | persons or|incidents  | explosions|   trips   |     or    |objects and
                               |           |           | animals(5)|    (6)    |           |           |  environ- | equipment 
                               |           |           |           |           |           |           |   ments   |           
     __________________________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________
                               |           |           |           |           |           |           |           |           
       Total...................|   4,693   |   4,383   |     767   |   1,789   |     116   |     668   |     320   |     712   
                               |           |           |           |           |           |           |           |           
     Alabama...................|      75   |      81   |      20   |      28   |     –     |       8   |       4   |      20   
     Alaska....................|      39   |      30   |       9   |      16   |     –     |     –     |     –     |       4   
     Arizona...................|      69   |      37   |      11   |      14   |     –     |     –     |     –     |       7   
     Arkansas..................|      93   |      63   |      13   |      23   |       5   |       5   |       8   |       9   
     California................|     390   |     339   |      67   |     129   |       6   |      54   |      22   |      60   
     Colorado..................|      92   |      80   |      15   |      32   |       4   |      15   |       3   |      10   
     Connecticut...............|      37   |      36   |      13   |       9   |       1   |       7   |     –     |       5   
     Delaware..................|      10   |      14   |       4   |       6   |     –     |     –     |     –     |     –     
     District of Columbia......|       9   |      11   |       5   |     –     |     –     |       4   |     –     |     –     
     Florida...................|     226   |     209   |      44   |      65   |       6   |      42   |      23   |      28   
     Georgia...................|     111   |      76   |      19   |      24   |       3   |      15   |       6   |       9   
     Hawaii....................|      26   |      19   |       3   |       3   |     –     |       8   |     –     |       4   
     Idaho.....................|      37   |      18   |     –     |      11   |     –     |     –     |     –     |       4   
     Illinois..................|     177   |     145   |      32   |      52   |       8   |      24   |      10   |      17   
     Indiana...................|     125   |     113   |      13   |      56   |     –     |      15   |       6   |      21   
     Iowa......................|      93   |      84   |       5   |      44   |     –     |       9   |       4   |      19   
     Kansas....................|      78   |      75   |       7   |      49   |       3   |       2   |     –     |      13   
     Kentucky..................|      93   |      84   |      16   |      40   |     –     |       8   |       3   |      15   
     Louisiana.................|     111   |     106   |      16   |      47   |       5   |      13   |      11   |      14   
     Maine.....................|      26   |      19   |     –     |       8   |     –     |       4   |       3   |       4   
     Maryland..................|      71   |      70   |      14   |      23   |     –     |      14   |       8   |      11   
     Massachusetts.............|      68   |      33   |       7   |      13   |     –     |       7   |       1   |       5   
     Michigan..................|     141   |     127   |      40   |      42   |     –     |      21   |       4   |      17   
     Minnesota.................|      60   |      70   |      11   |      28   |       3   |       8   |       6   |      14   
     Mississippi...............|      63   |      60   |      13   |      22   |     –     |       7   |       3   |      13   
     Missouri..................|     132   |      83   |      10   |      42   |     –     |      15   |       7   |       8   
     Montana...................|      49   |      34   |       2   |      13   |     –     |       7   |       3   |       7   
     Nebraska..................|      39   |      48   |     –     |      25   |     –     |       6   |       5   |      10   
     Nevada....................|      38   |      42   |      15   |      15   |     –     |       6   |     –     |       6   
     New Hampshire.............|       9   |      13   |     –     |       3   |       1   |     –     |     –     |       4   
     New Jersey................|      99   |      90   |      22   |      34   |       1   |      11   |       8   |      14   
     New Mexico................|      52   |      35   |       3   |      16   |     –     |       6   |       5   |       4   
     New York (including       |           |           |           |           |           |           |           |           
      N.Y.C.)..................|     206   |     196   |      40   |      61   |       5   |      47   |      11   |      32   
       New York City...........|      72   |      75   |      26   |      13   |     –     |      21   |       6   |       7   
     North Carolina............|     148   |     138   |      32   |      52   |     –     |      18   |      13   |      22   
     North Dakota..............|      44   |      64   |       3   |      39   |       5   |       7   |     –     |       8   
     Ohio......................|     155   |     154   |      22   |      52   |       3   |      32   |      10   |      35   
     Oklahoma..................|      86   |      94   |       7   |      51   |       4   |       9   |      11   |      12   
     Oregon....................|      58   |      43   |      11   |      20   |     –     |       6   |     –     |       5   
     Pennsylvania..............|     186   |     163   |      22   |      63   |       6   |      23   |      14   |      35   
     Rhode Island..............|       7   |       8   |     –     |       3   |     –     |     –     |     –     |     –     
     South Carolina............|      81   |      62   |      12   |      28   |     –     |       8   |       8   |       6   
     South Dakota..............|      31   |      31   |       3   |      17   |     –     |       4   |       2   |       5   
     Tennessee.................|     120   |     100   |      24   |      34   |     –     |      18   |       5   |      16   
     Texas.....................|     433   |     531   |      66   |     258   |      22   |      75   |      44   |      65   
     Utah......................|      39   |      39   |       7   |      16   |     –     |       4   |       3   |       7   
     Vermont...................|       8   |      10   |       1   |       3   |     –     |     –     |       4   |     –     
     Virginia..................|     127   |     146   |      18   |      62   |     –     |      28   |       8   |      29   
     Washington................|      60   |      64   |       6   |      26   |     –     |      14   |       7   |      11   
     West Virginia.............|      43   |      47   |       6   |      18   |       1   |       3   |       7   |      12   
     Wisconsin.................|      89   |     114   |      27   |      37   |       3   |      16   |       5   |      26   
     Wyoming...................|      32   |      35   |       5   |      17   |     –     |       4   |     –     |       7   
     __________________________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________|___________

       1 State totals include other events and exposures, such as bodily reaction, in addition to those shown separately.
       2 Totals for 2011 are revised and final.  Preliminary 2011 data issued September 20, 2012, reported a total of 4,609
     fatal work injuries for calendar year 2011.  Since then, an additional 84 job-related fatal injuries were identified,
     bringing the total job-related fatal injury count for 2011 to 4,693.  Includes two fatal injuries that occurred within the
     territorial boundaries of the United States, but a State of incident could not be determined.
       3 Includes zero fatal injuries that occurred within the territorial boundaries of the United States, but a State of
     incident could not be determined.
       4 Based on the BLS Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System (OIICS) 2.01 implemented for 2011 data forward.
       5 Includes violence by persons, self-inflicted injuries, and attacks by animals.
       6 Includes roadway, nonroadway, air, water, and rail fatal injuries, and fatal injuries resulting from being struck by a
     vehicle.
       p Data for 2012 are preliminary.  Revised and final 2012 data are scheduled to be released in Spring 2014.
       NOTE:  Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.  CFOI fatality counts exclude
     illness-related deaths unless precipitated by an injury event.
       SOURCE:  U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, in cooperation with State, New York City, District of
     Columbia, and Federal agencies, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

Table 6.  CFOI participating agencies and telephone numbers

State			Agency							Telephone number
Alabama			Department of Labor					(334) 242-3463
Alaska			Department of Labor and Workforce Development 		(907) 465-4539
Arizona			Industrial Commission					(602) 542-3737
Arkansas		Department of Labor					(501) 682-4542
California		Department of Industrial Relations			(626) 472-0446 ext. 5443
Colorado		Department of Public Health and Environment		(303) 691-4938
Connecticut		Department of Labor					(860) 263-6933
Delaware		Department of Labor					(302) 761-8219
Dist. of Columbia	Department of Health					(202) 442-9010
Florida			Bureau of Labor Statistics - Atlanta Region		(404) 893-8339

Georgia			Office of Insurance and Safety Fire Commissioner	(404) 463-0737
Hawaii 			Department of Labor and Industrial Relations 		(808) 586-9002
Idaho			Department of Labor					(208) 332-3570 ext. 3220
Illinois		Department of Public Health				(312) 814-8194
Indiana			Department of Labor					(317) 232-2668
Iowa			Division of Labor Services				(515) 281-5151
Kansas			Department of Labor					(785) 296-5000 ext. 2595
Kentucky		Labor Cabinet						(502) 564-4136
Louisiana		Workforce Commission					(225) 342-3126

Maine			Bureau of Labor Standards				(207) 623-7905
Maryland		Division of Labor and Industry				(410) 527-4463
Massachusetts		Department of Public Health				(617) 624-5679
Michigan   		Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs		(517) 322-1851
Minnesota		Department of Labor and Industry			(651) 284-5568
Mississippi		Department of Health					(601) 576-7186
Missouri   		Department of Labor and Industrial Relations		(573) 751-0807
Montana			Department of Labor and Industry			(406) 444-3297
Nebraska		Workers' Compensation Court				(402) 471-3547
Nevada			Division of Industrial Relations			(702) 486-9197
New Hampshire		Division of Vital Records Administration		(603) 271-4647

New Jersey		Department of Health					(609) 826-4984
New Mexico		Occupational Health and Safety Bureau			(505) 476-8740
New York State		Department of Health and Injury Prevention		(518) 402-7900
New York City 		Department of Health and Mental Hygiene			(646) 632-6729
North Carolina 		Department of Labor					(919) 733-0337
North Dakota		Bureau of Labor Statistics - Chicago Region		(312) 353-7253
Ohio			Department of Health					(614) 644-0135
Oklahoma   		Department of Labor					(405) 521-6858
Oregon 			Department of Consumer and Business Services		(503) 947-7364
Pennsylvania 		Department of Health 					(717) 783-2548

Rhode Island		Department of Health   					(401) 222-8051
South Carolina 		Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation		(803) 896-7673
South Dakota		Bureau of Labor Statistics - Chicago Region		(312) 353-7253
Tennessee  		Department of Labor and Workforce Development 		(615) 741-1749
Texas  			Dept. of Insurance, Div. of Workers' Compensation  	(512) 804-4658
Utah			Labor Commission, Statistics Program			(801) 530-6823
Vermont			Department of Labor					(802) 828-5985
Virginia   		Department of Labor and Industry			(804) 786-1035
Washington		Department of Labor and Industries 			(360) 902-5510
West Virginia 		Bureau of Labor Statistics - Philadelphia Region	(215) 861-5637
Wisconsin		State Laboratory of Hygiene				(608) 221-6293
Wyoming			Department of Workforce Services			(307) 473-3810
Guam			Department of Labor					(671) 475-7056
Puerto Rico		Negociado de Estadisticas				(787) 754-5300 ext. 3056
U.S. Virgin Islands	Occupational Safety and Health Statistics		(340) 776-3700 ext. 2019

TECHNICAL NOTES

Identification and verification of work-related fatalities

In 2012, there were 12 cases included for which work relationship could not be independently verified;
however, the information on the initiating source document for these cases was sufficient to determine
that the incident was likely to be job-related. Data for these fatalities are included in the Census of Fatal
Occupational Injuries (CFOI) counts. An additional 69 fatalities submitted by states were not included
because the source documents had insufficient information to determine work relationship and could not
be verified by either an independent source document or a follow-up questionnaire.

States may identify additional fatal work injuries after data collection closeout for a reference year. In
addition, other fatalities excluded from the published count because of insufficient information to
determine work relationship may subsequently be verified as work related. States have up to 7 months
from this release to update their initial published state counts. This procedure ensures that fatality data
are disseminated as quickly as possible and that legitimate cases are not excluded from the revised
counts. Thus, each year's initial release of data should be considered preliminary. Revised data are
released in the Spring of the following year; revised counts for 2012 will be available in 2014.

Over the last 3 years, increases in the published counts based on additional information have averaged
146 fatalities per year or about 3 percent of the revised total. The BLS news release issued September
20, 2012, reported a total of 4,609 fatal work injuries for 2011. With the April 2013 release of revised
data, an additional 84 net fatal work injuries were added, bringing the total for 2011 to 4,693.

Federal/State agency coverage

The Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries includes data for all fatal work injuries, whether the decedent
was working in a job covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) or other
federal or state agencies or was outside the scope of regulatory coverage. Thus, any comparison between
the BLS fatality census counts and those released by other agencies should take into account the
different coverage requirements and definitions being used by each agency.

Acknowledgements

BLS thanks the participating states, New York City, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S.
Virgin Islands, and Guam for their efforts in collecting accurate, comprehensive, and useful data on fatal
work injuries. BLS also appreciates the efforts of all federal, state, local, and private sector entities that
submitted source documents used to identify fatal work injuries. Among these agencies are the
Occupational Safety and Health Administration; the National Transportation Safety Board; the U.S.
Coast Guard; the Mine Safety and Health Administration; the Office of Workers’ Compensation
Programs (Federal Employees’ Compensation and Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation
divisions); the Federal Railroad Administration; the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration;
state vital statistics registrars, coroners, and medical examiners; state departments of health, labor and
industries, and workers’ compensation agencies; state and local police departments; and state farm
bureaus.

Information in this release is available to sensory-impaired individuals. Voice phone: (202) 606-7828;
TDD phone: (202) 606-5897; TDD message referral phone: 1-800-326-2577.

Last Modified Date: August 22, 2013
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