Occupational Employment Statistics

Chart Book, May 2008

Area Focus

Figures 30-31

Eighty-six percent of U.S. employment was found in metropolitan areas, but some occupations were concentrated in nonmetropolitan areas

Occupations found primarily in nonmetropolitan
areas, May 2008


Occupations with the highest concentration of employment in
metropolitan areas, May 2008


Figures 32-33

The main factor that caused the average wage in Durham, North Carolina, to exceed the U.S. average by 16 percent was the higher-than-average shares of employment in occupations that paid above-average wages

Distribution of employment in the United States and
in Durham, NC, by occupational group, May 2008


Detailed occupations with the highest concentrations of employment in Durham, NC, relative to the occupations' corresponding employment concentrations in the United States, May 2008
Occupation title Durham, NC employment Percent of Durham, NC employment Percent of total U.S. employment Concentration factor

Social scientists and related workers, all other

1,350 0.483 0.021 22.8

Natural sciences managers

1,250 0.449 0.032 14.0

Microbiologists

450 0.160 0.012 13.8

Health diagnosing and treating practitioners, all other

980 0.352 0.026 13.6

Biochemists and biophysicists

570 0.204 0.016 12.5

Statisticians

510 0.183 0.015 11.9

Biological technicians

1,750 0.626 0.053 11.7

Loan counselors

700 0.252 0.022 11.5

Medical scientists, except epidemiologists

2,210 0.791 0.074 10.7

Biological scientists, all other

560 0.201 0.021 9.6

Life scientists, all other

230 0.081 0.009 9.3

Life, physical, and social science technicians, all other

1,010 0.362 0.043 8.4

Survey researchers

360 0.131 0.016 8.3

Sociologists

60 0.020 0.003 6.7

Operations research analysts

830 0.296 0.045 6.6

Computer software engineers, systems software

4,860 1.743 0.282 6.2

Chemists

1,040 0.372 0.062 6.1

Social science research assistants

210 0.076 0.013 5.6

Epidemiologists

50 0.017 0.003 5.6

Mathematicians

30 0.012 0.002 5.4

Medical and clinical laboratory technologists

1,730 0.620 0.123 5.0

Figure 34

Occupational mean wages in all metropolitan areas in North Carolina were below national occupational mean wages, but employment was concentrated in higher paying occupations in three metropolitan areas

Differences between North Carolina metropolitan
area wages and the U.S. mean wage, May 2008


Figures 35-36

Transportation and material moving occupations accounted for 16 percent of employment in the Houma-Bayou Cane-Thibodaux, LA, metropolitan area, but only 2 percent of employment in the Los Alamos, NM, nonmetropolitan area

Employment in transportation and material moving
occupations, per 1,000 workers, by area, May 2008


Employment in computer and mathematical occupations,
per 1,000 workers, by State, May 2008


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Last Modified Date: April 2, 2010

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