Occupational Employment Statistics

Chart Book, May 2009

State and Area Focus

Figure 24

States with higher concentrations of employment in production occupations were in the Midwest along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. Production workers accounted for at least 10 percent of employment in Wisconsin, Indiana, Arkansas, Iowa, Alabama, and South Carolina.

Employment in production occupations, per 1,000 jobs, by State, May 2009


Figure 25

Wages were near average in States with high concentrations of production workers.

Mean annual wage of production occupations by State, May 2009


Figure 26

The five States bordering the Gulf of Mexico—Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas—represented about 17 percent of the total employment in the United States.

Employment concentrations for select occupations in the Gulf States, May 2009


Figure 27

New York had the highest concentration of fashion designers. With 6,990 fashioner designers, New York employed over 44 percent of the fashion designers in the country.

States with the highest concentrations of selected occupations, May 2009
Occupation State Employment per 1,000 jobs in State Employment per 1,000 jobs in United States Employment level in State

Industrial production managers

Michigan 2.16 1.13 8,410

Meeting and convention planners

District of Columbia 3.03 0.39 1,930

Insurance underwriters

Connecticut 2.20 0.75 3,620

Atmospheric and space scientists

Colorado 0.55 0.06 1,220

Mental health counselors

Pennsylvania 2.75 0.82 15,340

Fashion designers

New York 0.82 0.12 6,990

Optometrists

Hawaii 0.49 0.20 290

Home health aides

North Carolina 19.50 7.31 75,990

Parking enforcement workers

California 0.17 0.07 2,420

Crossing guards

New Jersey 1.44 0.52 5,540

Bartenders

Montana 12.34 3.77 5,330

Pest control workers

Florida 1.32 0.49 9,730

Gaming dealers

Nevada 18.99 0.67 22,400

Telemarketers

Utah 7.79 2.36 9,240

Bill and account collectors

South Dakota 11.80 3.09 4,640

Mine cutting and channeling machine operators

West Virginia 2.33 0.06 1,640

Slaughterers and meat packers

Nebraska 6.46 0.75 5,930

Figure 28

Several engineering occupations, including electronics, environmental, petroleum, aerospace, and chemical engineers were most highly concentrated in small States.

States with the highest concentrations in each engineering occupation, May 2009
Occupation State Employment per 1,000 jobs in State Employment per 1,000 jobs in United States Employment level in State

Aerospace engineers

Kansas 2.46 0.54 3,320

Agricultural engineers

North Dakota 0.15 0.02 50

Biomedical engineers

Utah 0.52 0.11 620

Chemical engineers

Delaware 1.26 0.22 520

Civil engineers

Alaska 4.58 1.99 1,410

Computer hardware engineers

Colorado 1.45 0.50 3,240

Electrical engineers

Idaho 2.59 1.16 1,590

Electronics engineers, except computer

Rhode Island 2.35 1.04 1,080

Environmental engineers

Wyoming 1.51 0.39 430

Health and safety engineers, except mining safety engineers and inspectors

Alaska 0.50 0.18 160

Industrial engineers

Michigan 5.14 1.60 20,000

Marine engineers and naval architects

Virginia 0.34 0.04 1,210

Materials engineers

Washington 0.50 0.17 1,400

Mechanical engineers

Michigan 7.53 1.78 29,330

Mining and geological engineers, including mining safety engineers

Wyoming 0.79 0.05 220

Nuclear engineers

Virginia 0.52 0.13 1,860

Petroleum engineers

Alaska 3.58 0.20 1,100

Figure 29

Architecture and engineering occupations accounted for 13 percent of employment in the St. Mary’s County, MD, but only 0.4 percent of the total employment in the Merced, CA, metropolitan area.

Employment in architecture and engineering occupations, per 1,000 jobs, by area, May 2009


Figure 30

Mean annual wage of architecture and engineering occupations, by area, May 2009


Figure 31

Employment declined in almost all occupational groups in the New Orleans metropolitan area between May 2005 and May 2009.

Employment by occupational group in the New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA,
area, May 2005 and May 2009


Figure 32

Employment declined in about 65 percent of detailed occupations in the New Orleans metropolitan area between May 2005 and May 2009.

Occupations in the New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA, area, with large declines
in employment between May 2005 to May 2009


Figure 33

Within the New York metropolitan area, the New York-White Plains-Wayne, NY-NJ, division had the highest wages overall and in 12 of the 22 occupational groups.

Hourly mean wages for occupational groups in the New York metropolitan divisions


Figure 34

Wages for financial analysts varied widely based on their geographical location within the New York metropolitan area.

Wages of selected occupations in New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA,
metropolitan statistical area divisions, May 2009


Figure 35

Both Palm Coast, FL, a fast-growing metropolitan area, and Weirton-Steubenville, a slow-growing area, had below-average employment shares of most high-paying occupational groups.

Distribution of employment in Palm Coast, FL; Weirton-Steubenville, WV-OH;
and the United States, by occupational group, May 2009


Figure 36

Hourly mean wages in Palm Coast, FL; Weirton-Steubenville, WV-OH;
and the United States, by occupational group, May 2009


Figure 37

Palm Coast, FL, had an above-average employment share of landscaping and groundskeeping workers, while Weirton-Steubenville, WV-OH, had above-average shares of several production occupations.

Employment shares for selected occupations in Palm Coast, FL,
and the United States, May 2009


Figure 38

Employment shares for selected occupations in Weirton-Steubenville, WV-OH,
and the United States, May 2009


Figure 39

Nonmetropolitan areas had higher shares of employment in production occupations than metropolitan areas.

Distribution of employment in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas,
by occupational groups, May 2009


Figure 40

Four occupations associated with finance and insurance had 96 percent or more of employment in metropolitan areas: actuaries; insurance appraisers, auto damage; financial analysts; and brokerage clerks.

Occupations with the highest concentration of employment in metropolitan areas, May 2009


Figure 41

Nonmetropolitan areas accounted for 14 percent of U.S. jobs in May 2009, but 50 percent or more of employment in the occupations in figure 41.

Occupations found primarily in nonmetropolitan areas, May 2009


Figure 42

Wages for most occupations were higher in metropolitan areas than in nonmetropolitan areas, but the wage differences between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas were particularly large for the 20 occupations shown in figure 42.

Occupations with the largest percentage wage differences between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas, May 2009
Occupation Mean hourly wage, metropolitan areas Mean hourly wage, nonmetropolitan areas Percentage difference between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan mean hourly wages

Actors

$29.52 $13.81 114

Broadcast news analysts

34.27 17.38 97

Producers and directors

42.31 23.02 84

Radio and television announcers

21.98 12.17 81

Film and video editors

30.99 17.95 73

Reporters and correspondents

22.21 13.23 68

Administrative law judges, adjudicators, and hearing officers

43.71 26.49 65

Writers and authors

31.84 19.63 62

Advertising and promotions managers

47.96 30.22 59

Art directors

44.52 28.08 59

Multi-media artists and animators

30.34 19.18 58

Artists and related workers, all other

28.69 18.14 58

Lawyers

63.15 40.32 57

Economists

47.09 30.27 56

Historians

28.45 18.79 51

Editors

28.72 19.34 49

Advertising sales agents

26.42 17.80 48

Police and sheriff's patrol officers

27.91 18.82 48

Financial managers

56.19 37.98 48

Camera operators, television, video, and motion picture

24.03 16.25 48

Previous: Industry focus

Last Modified Date: November 22, 2010

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