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Multiple jobholding rates higher in North

November 08, 2000

Multiple jobholding rates among the States varied widely in 1999. Generally, States in the northern half of the country tended to have higher rates of multiple jobholding, while those in the southern half tended to have lower rates.

 Map showing Multiple jobholding rates by State, 1999 annual averages
[Chart data—TXT]

North Dakota and Montana had the highest multiple jobholding rates at 10.3 percent each. For the sixth consecutive year, Minnesota had a double-digit multiple jobholding rate, 10.0 percent.

Louisiana recorded the lowest multiple jobholding rate at 3.8 percent. This marks the fourth time in the last 5 years that Louisiana has had the lowest rate of all States. Mississippi had the second lowest rate, 4.3 percent, followed by three other States at 4.5 percent each.

The largest over-the-year percentage point declines in multiple jobholding were recorded in Virginia (-1.5), Kansas (-1.2) and Arizona (-1.0). Rhode Island and Hawaii had the largest increases from the prior year, 1.1 and 1.0 percentage point, respectively.

The 1999 multiple jobholding data are from the Current Population Survey. Multiple jobholders are employed persons who had either two or more jobs as a wage and salary worker, were self-employed and also held a wage and salary job, or worked as an unpaid family worker and also held a wage and salary job. Find out more information on multiple jobholding by State in "Regional Trends," Monthly Labor Review, September 2000.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Economics Daily, Multiple jobholding rates higher in North on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2000/nov/wk1/art03.htm (visited October 25, 2014).

OF INTEREST

Three recent editions of Spotlight on Statistics

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