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Full-time on-call workers most likely to be men

March 10, 2001

Adult men working on-call were more than twice as likely to be employed full-time than were adult women in 1999. Women employed on-call were about twice as likely to work full-time than were 16 to 19 years olds of both sexes.

Percent of on-call workers employed full time, by sex and age, February 1999
[Chart data—TXT]

In 1999, 72.7 percent of all adult men working on-call were working full-time compared to 33.4 percent of all adult women. Among teenagers working on-call, 16.2 percent were employed full-time. Overall, 49.4 percent of all on-call workers were working full-time.

On-call workers do not have an established schedule for reporting to work, but rather work on an as-needed basis. They may be scheduled to work for months at a time, as a substitute teacher, for example.

These data are a product of a February supplement to the monthly Current Population Survey. Find out more in "Characteristics of and preference for alternative work arrangements, 1999," by Marisa DiNatale, Monthly Labor Review, March 2001.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Full-time on-call workers most likely to be men on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2001/may/wk1/art04.htm (visited August 20, 2014).

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