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About one in ten 16-year-old students working more than half-time

October 10, 2001

In 1997, about one in ten 16-year-old students worked for pay more than 20 hours per week, according to data from the National Longitudinal Surveys.

Hours worked per week by school-enrolled 16 year-olds in the week prior to the interview, National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), 1997, by race or Hispanic origin
[Chart data—TXT]

White students tended to be more likely to work over 20 hours per week than black or Hispanic students. In 1997, 12.3 percent of white school-enrolled 16-year-olds worked 21 or more hours. This compares with 6.2 percent of black 16-year-olds and 8.0 percent of Hispanic 16-year-olds.

Overall, 10.5 percent of 16-year-old students worked 21 or more hours per week, while 61.6 percent reported no hours worked at all.

Data on the employment experience and other characteristics of youths are a product of the National Longitudinal Surveys program. Additional information is available from "Youth employment during school: results from two longitudinal surveys," by Donna S. Rothstein, Monthly Labor Review, August 2001.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Economics Daily, About one in ten 16-year-old students working more than half-time on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2001/oct/wk2/art02.htm (visited November 28, 2014).

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