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Median usual weekly earnings, by race, ethnicity, and education, second quarter, 2011

July 21, 2011

Median weekly earnings of the nation's 100.6 million full-time wage and salary workers were $753 in the second quarter of 2011. Median weekly earnings of Hispanics who worked full time ($565) were lower than the median weekly earnings of blacks ($623), whites ($770), and Asians ($872).

Quartiles of usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers, by race and ethnicity and educational attainment, 2nd quarter 2011
[Chart data]

By educational attainment, full-time workers age 25 and over without a high school diploma had median weekly earnings of $458, compared with $643 for high school graduates (no college) and $1,043 for those holding a bachelor's degree.

Half of all workers age 25 and over without a high school diploma (those with earnings between the first and third quartiles) had weekly earnings between $348 and $637. The highest earning 25 percent of workers with bachelor's degrees (those with earnings above the third quartile) earned $1,548 or more per week.

These data are from the Current Population Survey. To learn more, see "Usual Weekly Earnings of Wage and Salary Workers: Second Quarter 2011" (HTML) (PDF), news release USDL-11-1082. Note: 25 percent of all full-time wage and salary workers earn less than the upper limit of the first quartile; 50 percent earn less than the upper limit of the second quartile (or median); 75 percent earn less than the upper limit of the third quartile. Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Median usual weekly earnings, by race, ethnicity, and education, second quarter, 2011 on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2011/ted_20110721.htm (visited August 21, 2014).

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