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13-337-ATL

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

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Mass Layoffs in Florida — 2012 Annual Totals

Employers in Florida took 852 mass layoff actions in 2012 that resulted in the separation of 62,173 workers, as measured by new filings for unemployment insurance benefits during the year, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (See chart 1.) Each action involved at least 50 persons from a single employer. Regional Commissioner Janet S. Rankin noted that the number of initial claims for unemployment insurance has declined each of the last three years after reaching a series high of 131,190 in 2009. In 2012, initial claims for unemployment insurance declined by 17,593.

Chart 1. Mass layoff initial claims, Florida, annual totals, 2009-12


Industry distribution

Of all the industry sectors in Florida, administrative and waste services experienced the most mass layoff events in 2012, with 279–more than twice the number occurring in any other industry. (See table 1.) This sector also had the largest number of initial claimants for unemployment insurance at 19,406, making up 31.2 percent of the state's total. Retail trade was second with 117 mass layoff events and 10,593 associated claims during the year, followed by accommodation and food services with 77 events and 5,910 claims. Combined, these three industries accounted for almost three-fifths of all initial claimants in the state in 2012.

Of the 14 sectors recording a drop in mass layoffs-related initial claimants from 2011 to 2012, administrative and waste services had the largest decrease at 7,553, followed by government with 3,291. Three other sectors finished 2012 with at least 1,000 fewer initial claimants than in 2011, construction (-1,730) accommodation and food services (-1,478) and retail trade (-1,471). On a percentage basis, construction experienced the largest over-the-year decrease in annual claims, down 53.7 percent, followed by government, down 48.5 percent.

In contrast, three sectors saw a rise in the number of initial claims associated with mass layoff events in 2012, led by arts, entertainment, and recreation, up 286 or 20.7 percent. Professional and technical services had the second highest increase in claims, up 132 or 4.5 percent, followed by finance and insurance (20, 1.1 percent).

Among the states, California recorded the highest number of mass layoff initial claims, 327,275, in 2012. New York ranked second with 141,137, followed by Pennsylvania (106,303) and New Jersey (85,979). Thirty-five states and the District of Columbia experienced over-the-year decreases in total initial claims for the year, led by California (-50,138), Wisconsin (-19,338), and Pennsylvania (-18,535). Fourteen states had increases in annual claims from 2011 to 2012, led by New York (21,739), North Carolina (19,537) and New Jersey (19,168). In three of these states, Arkansas, New Jersey, and North Carolina, initial claims reached a series high in 2012.

Technical Note

The Mass Layoff Statistics (MLS) program is a federal-state program that uses a standardized automated approach to identifying, describing, and tracking the effects of major job cutbacks, using data from each state's unemployment insurance database. Each month, states report on employers which have at least 50 initial claims filed against them during a consecutive 5-week period. These employers then are contacted by the state agency to determine whether these separations lasted 31 days or longer, and, if so, other information concerning the layoff is collected. States report on layoffs lasting more than 1 month on a quarterly basis.

A given month contains an aggregation of the weekly unemployment insurance claims filings for the Sunday through Saturday weeks in that month. All weeks are included for the particular month, except if the first day of the month falls on Saturday. In this case, the week is included in the prior month's tabulations. This means that some months will contain 4 weeks and others, 5 weeks. The number of weeks in a given month may be different from year to year, and the number of weeks in a year may vary. Therefore, analysis of over-the-month and over-the-year change in not seasonally adjusted series should take this calendar effect into consideration.

The MLS program resumed operations in April 1995 after it had been terminated in November 1992 due to lack of funding. Prior to April 1995, monthly layoff statistics were not available.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: 202-691-5200; Federal Relay Service: 800-877-8339.

Definitions

Employer. Employers in the MLS program include those covered by state unemployment insurance laws. Information on employers is obtained from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, which is administered by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Industry. Employers are classified according to the 2007 version of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). For temporary help and professional employer organization industries, monthly MLS-related statistics generally reflect layoffs related to underlying client companies in other industries. An individual layoff action at a client company can be small, but when initial claimants associated with many such layoffs are assigned to a temporary help or professional employer organization firm, a mass layoff event may trigger.

Initial claimant. A person who files any notice of unemployment to initiate a request either for a determination of entitlement to and eligibility for compensation, or for a subsequent period of unemployment within a benefit year or period of eligibility.

Mass layoff event. Fifty or more initial claims for unemployment insurance benefits filed against an employer during a 5-week period, regardless of duration.

Table 1. Mass layoff events and initial claimants for unemployment insurance, selected industries, Florida, annual totals
Industry Mass layoff events Initial claimants for unemployment insurance
2009 2010 2011 2012 2009 2010 2011 2012

Total, all industries (1)

1,748 1,231 1,091 852 131,190 88,776 79,766 62,173

Total private

1,645 1,134 999 799 122,334 82,106 72,977 58,675

Agriculture forestry fishing and hunting

30 37 26 26 2,077 2,274 1,792 1,745

Crop production

13 15 11 11 1,140 1,088 831 927

Agriculture and forestry support activities

17 22 15 15 937 1,186 961 818

Total, private nonfarm

1,615 1,097 973 773 120,257 79,832 71,185 56,930

Utilities

(3) (3) 5 (3) (3) (3) 301 (3)

Construction

91 51 46 26 5,420 2,877 3,219 1,489

Construction of buildings

28 13 11 11 2,021 931 1,128 676

Heavy and civil engineering construction

14 19 20 7 742 1,024 1,322 334

Specialty trade contractors

49 19 15 8 2,657 922 769 479

Manufacturing

205 84 71 62 14,599 6,068 5,164 4,488

Food

16 12 16 13 1,696 1,421 1,468 1,635

Beverage and tobacco products

8 9 5 6 929 576 475 443

Chemicals

(3) (3) 7 (3) (3) (3) 386 (3)

Nonmetallic mineral products

21 10 7 (3) 1,155 562 287 (3)

Fabricated metal products

13 6 (3) (3) 936 285 (3) (3)

Machinery (2)

14 (3) (3) 4 848 (3) (3) 233

Computer and electronic products

22 (3) 8 5 1,235 (3) 512 252

Transportation equipment (2)

50 24 11 (3) 4,062 1,964 812 (3)

Wholesale trade

48 17 21 15 2,777 1,080 1,163 800

Merchant wholesalers durable goods

29 10 8 9 1,795 676 587 520

Merchant wholesalers nondurable goods

17 7 11 5 870 404 480 241

Retail trade

216 151 145 117 17,246 13,359 12,064 10,593

Motor vehicle and parts dealers

15 8 11 (3) 644 397 614 (3)

Electronics and appliance stores

22 13 8 8 2,110 673 444 447

Building material and garden supply stores

14 11 9 (3) 1,209 977 965 (3)

Food and beverage stores

28 20 16 19 2,494 2,283 2,094 2,143

Health and personal care stores

15 11 10 (3) 1,084 830 883 (3)

Gasoline stations

17 14 15 8 965 775 781 421

Clothing and clothing accessories stores

20 11 10 9 1,330 536 482 506

General merchandise stores

58 56 52 44 5,646 6,386 4,829 4,852

Nonstore retailers

9 (3) (3) 5 584 (3) (3) 513

Transportation and warehousing

45 27 20 19 3,403 3,296 2,720 2,291

Truck transportation

8 (3) 3 (3) 485 (3) 184 (3)

Transit and ground passenger transportation

14 10 11 13 1,758 1,889 2,243 1,965

Information

46 22 26 16 2,886 1,278 1,442 1,175

Telecommunications

27 18 20 14 1,704 1,074 1,144 945

Finance and insurance (2)

85 46 29 24 6,262 2,928 1,752 1,772

Credit intermediation and related activities

64 34 24 22 5,106 2,355 1,515 1,678

Insurance carriers and related activities

14 8 (3) (3) 725 385 (3) (3)

Real estate and rental and leasing (2)

31 19 12 11 1,739 958 822 528

Real estate (2)

15 11 8 10 967 625 409 453

Rental and leasing services

16 8 (3) (3) 772 333 (3) (3)

Professional and technical services (2)

57 44 44 42 3,312 3,319 2,949 3,081

Administrative and waste services (2)

483 403 360 279 42,324 29,642 26,959 19,406

Administrative and support services (2)

480 401 358 279 42,201 29,564 26,862 19,406

Educational services

13 9 15 10 663 474 855 691

Health care and social assistance

41 38 37 37 2,398 2,311 2,458 2,398

Hospitals

12 12 10 11 669 768 502 477

Nursing and residential care facilities

11 11 12 9 600 610 613 451

Social assistance

12 8 10 15 769 605 1,110 1,373

Arts entertainment and recreation

39 30 23 25 3,168 2,259 1,379 1,665

Performing arts and spectator sports

12 8 8 5 608 459 413 213

Amusements gambling and recreation

27 22 15 20 2,560 1,800 966 1,452

Accommodation and food services

186 136 106 77 12,473 9,010 7,388 5,910

Accommodations

58 30 20 15 3,544 1,481 1,083 809

Food services and drinking places

128 106 86 62 8,929 7,529 6,305 5,101

Other services except public administration

19 14 11 9 960 663 479 459

Membership associations and organizations

10 6 7 6 528 286 300 306

Government

103 97 92 53 8,856 6,670 6,789 3,498

Federal

11 14 14 5 659 1,254 1,370 209

State

18 18 19 7 909 838 1,169 347

Local

74 65 59 41 7,288 4,578 4,250 2,942

Footnotes:
(1) Total includes all industries, including those not listed in the table.
(2) Data beginning in 2008 are not strictly comparable to prior years due to a change in the NAICS versions.
(3) Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.

Last Modified Date: April 3, 2013

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