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13-1137-DAL

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

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County Employment and Wages in New Mexico – Fourth Quarter 2012


New Mexico’s only large county, Bernalillo, reported an employment increase of 1.3 percent from December 2011 to December 2012, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported today. (See table 1. Large counties are those with 2011 annual average employment levels of 75,000 or more.) Regional Commissioner Stanley W. Suchman noted that the rate of employment growth in Bernalillo County was below the national average.

Nationally, employment advanced 1.9 percent from December 2011 to December 2012 as 287 of the 328 largest U.S. counties registered increases. Elkhart, Ind., recorded the highest percentage increase in the country, up 7.4 percent over the year. Sangamon, Ill., registered the largest percentage employment decline among large counties, down 2.5 percent.

Employment in Bernalillo County stood at 313,900 in December 2012, accounting for 39.4 percent of total employment in New Mexico. Nationwide, the largest 328 counties made up 71.3 percent of total U.S. employment, which stood at 133.7 million in December 2012, up 2.4 million from December 2011. These large counties had a net gain of 1.8 million jobs over the year, accounting for 73.3 percent of the overall U.S. employment increase.

The average weekly wage in Bernalillo County rose 0.7 percent from the fourth quarter of 2011 to the fourth quarter of 2012 compared to a nationwide gain of 4.7 percent. (See table 1.) Bernalillo’s percentage change ranked it 298th among the largest U.S. counties. Over the year, 316 of the 328 largest counties registered increases in average weekly wages. San Mateo, Calif., had the largest wage gain, up 107.3 percent from the fourth quarter of 2011. Douglas County, Colo., was second with a wage increase of 48.0 percent, followed by the counties of Virginia Beach City, Va. (13.3 percent), and Rockingham, N.H. (12.0 percent).

Among the large U.S. counties, only 10 experienced over-the-year wage declines. Lake, Ohio, experienced the largest decrease in average weekly wages with a loss of 3.2 percent over the year. Passaic, N.J., had the second largest decline in average weekly wages, down 2.1 percent from the fourth quarter 2011, followed by Genesee, Mich. (-1.7 percent), Atlantic, N.J. (-1.4 percent), and Benton, Wash. (-1.0 percent).

The average weekly wage in Bernalillo stood at $836 in the fourth quarter of 2012, placing it 243rd in the national ranking for average wages. Seventy percent of the largest U.S. counties (231) reported weekly wages below the national average of $1,000. Horry County, S.C. reported the lowest wage ($576), followed by the Texas counties of Cameron ($609) and Hidalgo ($612). Wages in these lowest-ranked counties were less than twenty percent of the average weekly wage reported for the highest-ranked county, San Mateo, Calif.

Nationally, 97 large counties registered average weekly wages above the U.S. average of $1,000 in the fourth quarter of 2012. San Mateo, Calif., held the top position among the highest-paid large counties with an average weekly wage of $3,240. New York, N.Y., was second at $2,107, followed by Santa Clara, Calif. ($1,906).

Average weekly wages in New Mexico’s smaller counties

Employment and wage levels (but not over-the-year changes) are also available for the 32 counties in New Mexico with employment levels below 75,000. All but one of these smaller counties had average weekly wages below the $1,000 national average. Los Alamos County was the single exception where average weekly wages stood at $1,519. Wages in Lea ($998) and Eddy ($973) were nearly equal to the nationwide average and pay levels in Santa Fe ($887) and San Juan ($856) were also above the large county of Bernalillo ($836). Guadalupe County reported the lowest weekly wage in the state at $504 in the fourth quarter of 2012. (See table 2.)

When all 33 counties in New Mexico were considered, 13 had weekly wages averaging $599 or less. Eleven additional counties averaged from $600 to $699 per week, three reported wages from $700 to $799, three from $800 to $899, and three had wages exceeding $900. (See chart 1.) The counties with the highest average wages were concentrated around the metropolitan areas of Albuquerque, Carlsbad, Farmington, Hobbs, and Santa Fe.

Additional statistics and other Information

QCEW data for states have been included in this release in table 3. For additional information about quarterly employment and wages data, please read the Technical Note or visit www.bls.gov/cew/.

Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online features comprehensive information by detailed industry on establishments, employment, and wages for the nation and all states. The 2011 edition of this publication contains selected data produced by Business Employment Dynamics (BED) on job gains and losses, as well as selected data from the first quarter 2012 version of the news release. Tables and additional content from Employment and Wages Annual Averages 2011 are now available online at www.bls.gov/cew/cewbultn11.htm. The 2012 edition of Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online will be available later in 2013.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: 202-691-5200; Federal Relay Service: 1-800-877-8339.

Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the United States on October 29, 2012, during the QCEW fourth quarter reference period. This event did not warrant changes to QCEW methodology.

Technical Note

Average weekly wage data by county are compiled under the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, also known as the ES-202 program. The data are derived from summaries of employment and total pay of workers covered by state and federal unemployment insurance (UI) legislation and provided by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The 9.2 million employer reports covered 133.7 million full- and part-time workers. The average weekly wage values are calculated by dividing quarterly total wages by the average of the three monthly employment levels of those covered by UI programs. The result is then divided by 13, the number of weeks in a quarter. It is to be noted, therefore, that over-the-year wage changes for geographic areas may reflect shifts in the composition of employment by industry, occupation, and such other factors as hours of work. Thus, wages may vary among counties, metropolitan areas, or states for reasons other than changes in the average wage level. Data for all states, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), counties, and the nation are available on the BLS Web site at www.bls.gov/cew/; however, data in QCEW press releases have been revised (see Technical Note below) and may not match the data contained on the Bureau’s Web site.

QCEW data are not designed as a time series. QCEW data are simply the sums of individual establishment records reflecting the number of establishments that exist in a county or industry at a point in time. Establishments can move in or out of a county or industry for a number of reasons—some reflecting economic events, others reflecting administrative changes.

The preliminary QCEW data presented in this release may differ from data released by the individual states as well as from the data presented on the BLS Web site. These potential differences result from the states’ continuing receipt, review and editing of UI data over time. On the other hand, differences between data in this release and the data found on the BLS Web site are the result of adjustments made to improve over-the-year comparisons. Specifically, these adjustments account for administrative (noneconomic) changes such as a correction to a previously reported location or industry classification. Adjusting for these administrative changes allows users to more accurately assess changes of an economic nature (such as a firm moving from one county to another or changing its primary economic activity) over a 12-month period. Currently, adjusted data are available only from BLS press releases.


Table 1. Covered (1) employment and wages in the United States and the largest county in New Mexico, fourth quarter 2012 (2)
Area Employment Average Weekly Wage (3)
December
2012
(thousands)
Percent change,
December
2011-12 (4)
National
ranking by
percent change (5)
Average
weekly
wage
National
ranking by
level (5)
Percent change,
fourth quarter
2011-12 (4)
National
ranking by
percent change (5)

United States (6)

133,726.8 1.9 -- $1,000 -- 4.7 --

New Mexico

796.8 1.5 -- 802 41 0.4 51

Bernalillo, N.M.

313.9 1.3 186 836 243 0.7 298

(1) Includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
(2) Data are preliminary.
(3) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(4) Percent changes were computed from quarterly employment and pay data adjusted for noneconomic county reclassifications.
(5) Ranking does not include the county of San Juan, Puerto Rico.
(6) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.



Table 2. Covered (1) employment and wages in the United States and all counties in New Mexico, fourth quarter 2012 (2)
Area Employment
December
2012
Average
Weekly
Wage (3)
Area Employment
December
2012
Average
Weekly
Wage (3)

United States (4)

133,726,808 $1,000

Luna

7,052 $634

New Mexico

796,793 802

McKinley

21,390 630

Bernalillo

313,853 836

Mora

711 589

Catron

634 522

Otero

17,765 658

Chaves

21,205 641

Quay

2,701 540

Cibola

7,858 660

Rio Arriba

9,603 627

Colfax

4,938 620

Roosevelt

6,552 546

Curry

17,154 655

Sandoval

29,410 779

De Baca

483 594

San Juan

50,354 856

Doña Ana

70,864 678

San Miguel

8,161 568

Eddy

25,937 973

Santa Fe

61,407 887

Grant

9,798 712

Sierra

3,270 531

Guadalupe

1,309 504

Socorro

5,440 651

Harding

165 545

Taos

10,721 578

Hidalgo

1,617 726

Torrance

3,278 579

Lea

31,078 998

Union

1,270 608

Lincoln

6,433 554

Valencia

13,607 565

Los Alamos

15,579 1,519

(1) Includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
(2) Data are preliminary.
(3) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(4) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.



Table 3. Covered (1) employment and wages by state, fourth quarter 2012 (2)
State Employment Average weekly wage (3)
December
2012
(thousands)
Percent change,
December
2011-12
Average
weekly
wage
National
ranking by
level
Percent change,
fourth quarter
2011-12
National
ranking by
percent change

United States (4)

133,726.8 1.9 $1,000 -- 4.7 --

Alabama

1,847.3 1.1 854 33 2.6 41

Alaska

314.8 1.1 1,007 15 2.7 38

Arizona

2,509.2 2.4 912 22 3.3 33

Arkansas

1,160.3 0.2 767 47 4.2 19

California

15,216.3 3.3 1,186 5 7.8 2

Colorado

2,311.4 2.7 1,032 11 5.8 5

Connecticut

1,657.6 1.0 1,253 3 5.3 8

Delaware

411.0 1.2 1,044 9 6.1 4

District of Columbia

721.5 1.7 1,703 1 2.2 47

Florida

7,535.5 2.3 880 27 3.9 23

Georgia

3,889.9 1.7 927 21 4.7 13

Hawaii

620.7 2.1 868 30 2.7 38

Idaho

618.4 2.0 732 50 2.1 48

Illinois

5,697.9 1.1 1,058 8 4.4 17

Indiana

2,850.5 1.8 816 40 3.4 32

Iowa

1,486.6 1.3 821 39 3.7 26

Kansas

1,339.2 1.5 835 37 4.4 17

Kentucky

1,796.0 1.4 801 42 1.8 49

Louisiana

1,891.9 1.0 884 26 4.1 20

Maine

582.2 0.2 773 46 2.4 45

Maryland

2,544.1 1.2 1,086 7 2.5 42

Massachusetts

3,279.3 1.3 1,248 4 4.8 11

Michigan

3,988.9 1.9 954 18 2.3 46

Minnesota

2,677.2 1.6 985 16 5.1 10

Mississippi

1,096.5 1.1 720 51 3.2 34

Missouri

2,641.9 0.9 863 31 4.6 14

Montana

434.6 1.9 757 48 4.1 20

Nebraska

931.3 2.2 797 43 4.6 14

Nevada

1,145.8 1.9 877 28 2.9 35

New Hampshire

620.8 0.8 1,023 13 5.5 6

New Jersey

3,846.4 1.1 1,172 6 2.9 35

New Mexico

796.8 1.5 802 41 0.4 51

New York

8,741.9 1.4 1,280 2 6.9 3

North Carolina

3,963.9 1.9 854 33 3.6 29

North Dakota

421.0 6.1 944 20 8.4 1

Ohio

5,098.0 1.3 887 25 3.6 29

Oklahoma

1,565.3 1.9 847 35 3.9 23

Oregon

1,654.1 1.4 871 29 2.5 42

Pennsylvania

5,629.8 0.5 972 17 3.8 25

Rhode Island

456.4 1.0 945 19 2.7 38

South Carolina

1,832.2 2.0 784 45 2.8 37

South Dakota

401.7 1.2 749 49 3.5 31

Tennessee

2,710.4 2.1 903 24 5.2 9

Texas

10,956.4 3.2 1,027 12 5.5 6

Utah

1,246.6 3.7 844 36 4.5 16

Vermont

306.1 0.7 829 38 2.5 42

Virginia

3,663.7 1.1 1,042 10 3.7 26

Washington

2,902.0 2.1 1,017 14 4.0 22

West Virginia

714.3 0.0 788 44 1.5 50

Wisconsin

2,723.6 1.2 855 32 4.8 11

Wyoming

277.6 0.2 908 23 3.7 26

Puerto Rico

978.6 1.6 550 (5) -0.4 (5)

Virgin Islands

39.8 -7.9 738 (5) -3.9 (5)

(1) Includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
(2) Data are preliminary.
(3) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(4) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(5) Data not included in the national ranking.




Average weekly wages by county in New Mexico fourth quarter 2012