Mountain-Plains Information Office

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12-436-KAN

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

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Mass Layoffs in Missouri – 2011 Annual Totals

Employers in Missouri took 375 mass layoff actions in 2011 that resulted in the separation of 32,823 workers, as measured by new filings for unemployment insurance benefits during the year, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (See chart 1.) Each action involved at least 50 persons from a single employer. Regional Commissioner Stanley W. Suchman noted that though the number of mass layoff events in 2011 dropped from the previous year, the resulting initial claims rose slightly. Still, the number of claims in 2011 was the third-lowest recorded in the state since 1996 when annual data first became available.

Chart 1. Mass layoff initial claims, Missouri, annual totals, 2006-2011

Industry distribution

Of all the industry sectors in Missouri, manufacturing experienced the most mass layoff events in 2011 with 98. (See table 1.) This sector also had the largest number of initial claimants at 9,800, accounting for 29.9 percent of the state's total. (See chart 1.) Even though manufacturing accounted for the largest number of Missouri's initial claimants in 2011, it was the second-lowest count recorded for this industry since the inception of the series in 1996. Administrative and waste services had the second-highest mass layoff count, 48, but the 3,346 associated claims for unemployment insurance ranked fourth in the state. Accommodation and food services had the next largest number of events, 41, resulting in 4,385 claimants, second highest in the state, followed by retail trade with 38 events that led to 3,493 associated claims. Together, these four industry sectors accounted for almost two-thirds of the claimants in Missouri.

Construction had the largest decrease in mass layoff-related claims from 2010 to 2011 declining by 1,491. Declines in other sectors, including transportation and warehousing, local government, and information, were less than 500. Of these four sectors, only transportation and warehousing had registered a decrease in the number of initial claims in 2010. (See table A.) On a percentage basis, construction also experienced the largest decrease in annual claims from 2010 to 2011, down 47.3 percent, followed by information (-31.8 percent), and professional and business services (-29.4 percent).

Table A. Sectors with at least 250 fewer mass layoff initial claims in 2011, Missouri
Sector Net change from 2009–10 Net change from 2010–11

Construction

14 -1,491

Transportation and warehousing

-1,850 -463

Local government

161 -318

Information

72 -265

Seven industry sectors registered increases in the number of initial claims associated with mass layoff events in 2011. One of these sectors, accommodation and food services, recorded a series high of 4,385 claims. Two additional sectors—retail trade (3,493 claims) and state government (467 claims)—reported the second-highest levels in the history of these series.

Among the states, California recorded the greatest number of mass layoff initial claims during 2011 with 377,413, followed by Pennsylvania, New York, Florida, and Wisconsin. Twenty-nine states experienced over-the-year decreases in total initial claims for the year. The largest declines in claims occurred in California (-42,396), Illinois (-19,191), and Florida (-9,010).

Technical Note

The Mass Layoff Statistics (MLS) program is a federal-state program that uses a standardized automated approach to identifying, describing, and tracking the effects of major job cutbacks, using data from each state's unemployment insurance database. Each month, states report on employers which have at least 50 initial claims filed against them during a consecutive 5-week period. These employers then are contacted by the state agency to determine whether these separations lasted 31 days or longer, and, if so, other information concerning the layoff is collected. States report on layoffs lasting more than 1 month on a quarterly basis.

A given month contains an aggregation of the weekly unemployment insurance claims filings for the Sunday through Saturday weeks in that month. All weeks are included for the particular month, except if the first day of the month falls on Saturday. In this case, the week is included in the prior month's tabulations. This means that some months will contain 4 weeks and others, 5 weeks. The number of weeks in a given month may be different from year to year, and the number of weeks in a year may vary. Therefore, analysis of over-the-month and over-the-year change in not seasonally adjusted series should take this calendar effect into consideration.

The MLS program resumed operations in April 1995 after it had been terminated in November 1992 due to lack of funding. Prior to April 1995, monthly layoff statistics were not available.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay Service: (800) 877-8339.

Definitions. Employer. Employers in the MLS program include those covered by state unemployment insurance laws. Information on employers is obtained from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, which is administered by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Industry. Employers are classified according to the 2007 version of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). For temporary help and professional employer organization industries, monthly MLS-related statistics generally reflect layoffs related to underlying client companies in other industries. An individual layoff action at a client company can be small, but when initial claimants associated with many such layoffs are assigned to a temporary help or professional employer organization firm, a mass layoff event may trigger.

Initial claimant. A person who files any notice of unemployment to initiate a request either for a determination of entitlement to and eligibility for compensation, or for a subsequent period of unemployment within a benefit year or period of eligibility.

Mass layoff event. Fifty or more initial claims for unemployment insurance benefits filed against an employer during a 5-week period, regardless of duration.


Additional information

For personal assistance or further information on the Mass Layoffs Statistics program, as well as other Bureau programs, contact the Mountain-Plains Information Office at (816) 285-7000 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. CT.

Table 1. Mass layoff events and initial claimants for unemployment insurance, Missouri, selected sectors, annual totals
Industry Mass layoff events Initial claims for unemployment insurance
2008 2009 2010 2011 2008 2009 2010 2011

Total, all industries (1)

433 551 420 375 43,451 54,046 32,586 32,823

Total private

415 528 389 348 41,909 51,989 30,173 30,292

Total private nonfarm

415 527 389 348 41,909 51,941 30,173 30,292

Mining quarrying and oil and gas extraction

3 5 5 3 310 470 289 247

Mining except oil and gas

(3) (3) 5 3 (3) (3) 289 247

Construction

47 50 53 28 2,900 3,136 3,150 1,659

Construction of buildings

10 14 10 8 624 971 676 479

Heavy and civil engineering construction

13 14 20 14 925 924 1,142 819

Specialty trade contractors

24 22 23 6 1,351 1,241 1,332 361

Manufacturing

162 221 95 98 21,355 25,414 7,817 9,800

Food

13 17 17 22 1,029 1,136 1,332 1,510

Apparel (2)

(3) 6 (3) 5 (3) 290 (3) 289

Chemicals

(3) 9 5 (3) (3) 1,044 605 (3)

Plastics and rubber products (2)

9 18 3 11 730 2,097 314 780

Nonmetallic mineral products

5 7 (3) 3 390 359 (3) 130

Fabricated metal products

11 18 7 7 952 1,528 580 1,185

Machinery (2)

11 26 11 10 870 3,275 1,096 1,222

Transportation equipment (2)

53 55 21 18 12,460 10,339 1,541 3,008

Miscellaneous manufacturing (2)

(3) 5 5 (3) (3) 254 406 (3)

Retail trade

21 33 32 38 2,065 2,952 3,262 3,493

Building material and garden supply stores

(3) 6 6 5 (3) 364 367 278

Food and beverage stores

- (3) 4 7 - (3) 300 475

Gasoline stations

5 (3) 5 (3) 331 (3) 338 (3)

General merchandise stores

9 12 11 11 1,093 1,330 1,630 1,554

Nonstore retailers

(3) (3) 4 (3) (3) (3) 531 (3)

Transportation and warehousing

34 38 31 24 3,499 4,729 2,879 2,416

Truck transportation

10 15 6 (3) 654 1,043 462 (3)

Transit and ground passenger transportation

21 20 20 20 2,612 3,517 2,017 2,141

Information

(3) 13 13 9 (3) 762 834 569

Publishing industries except Internet

(3) 7 6 (3) (3) 404 446 (3)

Finance and insurance (2)

8 13 8 (3) 555 1,488 386 (3)

Credit intermediation and related activities

6 8 4 (3) 373 1,185 181 (3)

Professional and technical services (2)

5 8 7 5 322 646 592 418

Administrative and waste services (2)

41 58 48 48 2,821 4,091 3,095 3,346

Administrative and support services (2)

41 58 48 48 2,821 4,091 3,095 3,346

Health care and social assistance

16 18 22 20 1,338 1,458 1,588 1,564

Hospitals

- 4 7 (3) - 242 439 (3)

Social assistance

15 13 14 18 1,281 1,152 1,107 1,454

Arts entertainment and recreation

17 13 12 14 1,288 1,276 772 1,068

Performing arts and spectator sports

10 5 5 9 529 304 313 515

Amusements gambling and recreation

7 8 7 (3) 759 972 459 (3)

Accommodation and food services

39 39 45 41 3,843 4,314 4,234 4,385

Accommodations

5 9 8 6 258 597 464 333

Food services and drinking places

34 30 37 35 3,585 3,717 3,770 4,052

Other services except public administration

7 6 8 9 501 374 523 585

Membership associations and organizations

7 6 8 9 501 374 523 585

Government

18 23 31 27 1,542 2,057 2,413 2,531

Federal

7 5 8 9 789 555 616 1,132

State

5 7 8 7 302 413 547 467

Local

6 11 15 11 451 1,089 1,250 932

Footnotes:
(1) Total includes all industries including those not listed in the table.
(2) Data beginning in 2008 are not strictly comparable to prior years due to a change in NAICS versions.
(3) Data do not meet BLS or state agency disclosure standards.

NOTE: Dash represents zero.

Last Modified Date: March 7, 2012