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15-1739-SAN Thursday, September 03, 2015

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County Employment and Wages in California – Fourth Quarter 2014

Employment increased in all 26 of California’s large counties from December 2013 to December 2014, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (Large counties are defined as those with employment of 75,000 or more as measured by 2013 annual average employment.) Regional Commissioner Richard J. Holden noted that employment increases ranged from 4.8 percent in San Mateo County to 0.3 percent in Kern County.

Nationally, employment advanced 2.2 percent from December 2013 to December 2014 as 319 of the 339 largest U.S. counties gained jobs. Weld, Colo., and Midland Texas, had the largest percentage increases in the country, each up 8.0 percent over the year. Atlantic, N.J., had the largest over-the-year decrease in employment, down 5.0 percent.

Among the 26 largest counties in California, employment was highest in Los Angeles (4,243,800) in December 2014, while Yolo had the smallest employment level (92,300). Together, California’s large counties accounted for 92.6 percent of total employment within the state. Nationwide, the 339 largest counties made up 72.1 percent of total U.S. employment.

Average weekly wages increased in 25 of the 26 largest counties in California from the fourth quarter of 2013 to the fourth quarter of 2014. Nineteen of these counties had annual wage gains at or above the national increase of 3.5 percent. San Mateo was the only county with a wage decrease, but by level had the highest average weekly wage in the state and the nation ($2,166). Ten additional large counties in the state had average weekly wages that exceeded the national average weekly wage of $1,035. (See table 1.)

Employment and wage levels (but not over-the-year changes) are also available for the 32 counties in California with employment below 75,000. All except one of these smaller counties had average weekly wages below the national average in the fourth quarter of 2014. (See table 2.)

Large county wage changes

Average weekly wages increased over the year in all but 1 of the 26 large counties in California in the fourth quarter of 2014. Yolo County’s 7.1-percent wage gain placed 10th among the nation’s 339 large counties. The over-the-year wage increase in Santa Clara County (6.8 percent) ranked 15th in the national ranking. Wage gains in three additional large counties—Tulare (6.2 percent, 23rd), Marin (5.9 percent, 29th), and Placer (5.8 percent, 31st)—placed in the top 10 percent of the national ranking.

Among the 339 largest U.S. counties, 332 recorded gains in average weekly wages. Benton, Ark., had the largest wage increase (9.9 percent). In contrast, seven large counties nationwide experienced over-the-year decreases in average weekly wages. San Mateo, Calif., had the largest over-the-year wage decline (-20.4 percent).

Large county average weekly wages

Weekly wages in 11 of the state’s 26 large counties were above the national average of $1,035 per week. In the fourth quarter of 2014, average weekly wages in San Mateo ($2,166), Santa Clara ($2,114), and San Francisco ($1,850) ranked in the top five nationally. In contrast, at $739 per week, wages in Tulare ranked 326th among the nation’s 339 largest counties.

Nationally, 95 large counties registered average weekly wages above the U.S. average of $1,035 in the fourth quarter of 2014. In addition to the three California counties mentioned above, New York, N.Y. ($2,138) and Suffolk, Mass. ($1,856) were in the top five nationwide.

Among the 244 counties with an average weekly wage below the U.S. average in the fourth quarter of 2014, Horry County, S.C., reported the lowest average weekly wage ($610), followed by the Texas counties of Cameron ($621) and Hidalgo ($641).

Average weekly wages in California’s smaller counties

All except 1 of the 32 counties in California with employment below 75,000 had average weekly wages lower than the national average of $1,035. Among the smaller counties, Alpine County had the highest average weekly wage at $1,055. Mariposa County reported the lowest weekly wage among all counties in the state, averaging $648 in the fourth quarter of 2014. (See table 2.)

When all 58 counties in California were considered, 6 had wages below $700. Seventeen counties had average weekly wages ranging from $700 to $799, 16 had wages from $800 to $899, 3 had wages from $900 to $999, and 16 had wages at or above $1,000. (See chart 1.)

Additional statistics and other information

QCEW data for states have been included in this release in table 3. For additional information about quarterly employment and wages data, please read the Technical Note or visit www.bls.gov/cew.

Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online features comprehensive information by detailed industry on establishments, employment, and wages for the nation and all states. The 2013 edition of this publication, which was published in September 2014, contains selected data produced by Business Employment Dynamics (BED) on job gains and losses, as well as selected data from the first quarter 2014 version of the national news release. Tables and additional content from Employment and Wages Annual Averages 2013 are now available online at http://www.bls.gov/cew/cewbultn13.htm. The 2014 edition of Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online will be available in September 2015.

The County Employment and Wages release for first quarter 2015 is scheduled to be released on Thursday, September 17, 2015.


Technical Note

Average weekly wage data by county are compiled under the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, also known as the ES-202 program. The data are derived from summaries of employment and total pay of workers covered by state and federal unemployment insurance (UI) legislation and provided by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The 9.2 million employer reports cover 134.0 million full- and part-time workers. The average weekly wage values are calculated by dividing quarterly total wages by the average of the three monthly employment levels of those covered by UI programs. The result is then divided by 13, the number of weeks in a quarter. It is to be noted, therefore, that over-the-year wage changes for geographic areas may reflect shifts in the composition of employment by industry, occupation, and such other factors as hours of work. Thus, wages may vary among counties, metropolitan areas, or states for reasons other than changes in the average wage level. Data for all states, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), counties, and the nation are available on the BLS Web site at www.bls.gov/cew/; however, data in QCEW press releases have been revised (see Technical Note below) and may not match the data contained on the Bureau’s Web site.

QCEW data are not designed as a time series. QCEW data are simply the sums of individual establishment records reflecting the number of establishments that exist in a county or industry at a point in time. Establishments can move in or out of a county or industry for a number of reasons–some reflecting economic events, others reflecting administrative changes.

The preliminary QCEW data presented in this release may differ from data released by the individual states as well as from the data presented on the BLS Web site. These potential differences result from the states’ continuing receipt, review and editing of UI data over time. On the other hand, differences between data in this release and the data found on the BLS Web site are the result of adjustments made to improve over-the-year comparisons. Specifically, these adjustments account for administrative (noneconomic) changes such as a correction to a previously reported location or industry classification. Adjusting for these administrative changes allows users to more accurately assess changes of an economic nature (such as a firm moving from one county to another or changing its primary economic activity) over a 12-month period. Currently, adjusted data are available only from BLS press releases.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay Service: (800) 877-8339.

Table 1. Covered employment and wages in the United States and the 26 largest counties in California, fourth quarter 2014
Area Employment Average Weekly Wage (1)
December 2014 (thousands) Percent change, December 2013-14 (2) National ranking by percent change (3) Average weekly wage National ranking by level (3) Percent change, fourth quarter 2013-14 (2) National ranking by percent change (3)

United States (4)

139,204.8 2.2 -- $1,035 -- 3.5 --

California

16,068.5 2.6 -- 1,209 6 2.9 41

Alameda, Calif.

708.7 2.8 104 1,319 24 4.4 81

Contra Costa, Calif.

344.1 1.8 174 1,215 43 2.1 278

Fresno, Calif.

349.4 0.6 284 808 294 4.9 50

Kern, Calif.

306.9 0.3 303 873 239 2.7 235

Los Angeles, Calif.

4,243.8 1.6 197 1,201 49 3.5 168

Marin, Calif.

112.0 0.6 284 1,280 27 5.9 29

Monterey, Calif.

159.4 1.9 162 851 261 3.7 143

Orange, Calif.

1,506.0 2.6 112 1,162 55 4.3 87

Placer, Calif.

144.6 3.4 71 1,034 96 5.8 31

Riverside, Calif.

641.2 3.5 66 803 301 4.0 113

Sacramento, Calif.

620.7 2.2 140 1,095 68 2.7 235

San Bernardino, Calif.

682.3 4.4 25 852 258 3.5 168

San Diego, Calif.

1,359.7 1.9 162 1,138 58 2.6 244

San Francisco, Calif.

659.1 4.4 25 1,850 5 4.9 50

San Joaquin, Calif.

217.7 2.5 118 835 273 2.5 248

San Luis Obispo, Calif.

109.4 1.8 174 837 270 3.7 143

San Mateo, Calif.

385.0 4.8 18 2,166 1 -20.4 339

Santa Barbara, Calif.

186.5 2.5 118 981 138 4.9 50

Santa Clara, Calif.

999.3 3.6 57 2,114 3 6.8 15

Santa Cruz, Calif.

94.6 3.7 51 926 187 5.0 46

Solano, Calif.

129.6 1.7 183 1,026 104 0.9 322

Sonoma, Calif.

192.0 0.9 259 952 162 4.2 99

Stanislaus, Calif.

170.3 2.5 118 832 277 3.9 125

Tulare, Calif.

146.5 0.7 272 739 326 6.2 23

Ventura, Calif.

317.5 0.9 259 1,025 107 5.0 46

Yolo, Calif.

92.3 1.2 227 1,092 70 7.1 10

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Percent changes were computed from quarterly employment and pay data adjusted for noneconomic county reclassifications.
(3) Ranking does not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(4) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
 

Table 2. Covered employment and wages in the United States and all counties in California, fourth quarter 2014 (2)
Area Employment December 2014 Average Weekly Wage (1)

United States (2)

139,204,840 $1,035

California

16,068,487 1,209

Alameda

708,653 1,319

Alpine

536 1,055

Amador

11,443 816

Butte

76,994 757

Calaveras

8,238 708

Colusa

7,894 851

Contra Costa

344,074 1,215

Del Norte

7,842 703

El Dorado

50,559 899

Fresno

349,436 808

Glenn

8,188 734

Humboldt

46,096 724

Imperial

64,035 685

Inyo

7,279 808

Kern

306,904 873

Kings

43,632 795

Lake

14,985 661

Lassen

10,472 793

Los Angeles

4,243,837 1,201

Madera

46,645 782

Marin

111,966 1,280

Mariposa

4,824 648

Mendocino

31,341 704

Merced

73,806 740

Modoc

2,345 678

Mono

6,574 717

Monterey

159,400 851

Napa

70,226 1,003

Nevada

29,349 842

Orange

1,505,987 1,162

Placer

144,598 1,034

Plumas

5,752 784

Riverside

641,238 803

Sacramento

620,734 1,095

San Benito

15,008 851

San Bernardino

682,327 852

San Diego

1,359,701 1,138

San Francisco

659,074 1,850

San Joaquin

217,711 835

San Luis Obispo

109,429 837

San Mateo

384,952 2,166

Santa Barbara

186,503 981

Santa Clara

999,316 2,114

Santa Cruz

94,644 926

Shasta

62,168 784

Sierra

546 827

Siskiyou

12,499 699

Solano

129,596 1,026

Sonoma

192,046 952

Stanislaus

170,313 832

Sutter

27,062 751

Tehama

16,407 763

Trinity

2,491 677

Tulare

146,544 739

Tuolumne

16,834 783

Ventura

317,505 1,025

Yolo

92,333 1,092

Yuba

16,213 887

Footnotes
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

NOTE: Includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs. Data are preliminary.
 

Table 3. Covered employment and wages by state, fourth quarter 2014
State Employment Average weekly wage (1)
December 2014 (thousands) Percent change, December 2013-14 Average weekly wage National ranking by level Percent change, fourth quarter 2013-14 National ranking by percent change

United States (2)

139,204.8 2.2 $1,035 -- 3.5 --

Alabama

1,891.4 1.3 881 35 3.5 31

Alaska

317.6 0.8 1,063 13 4.0 20

Arizona

2,630.8 2.2 926 25 2.3 47

Arkansas

1,180.5 2.2 807 47 4.5 5

California

16,068.5 2.6 1,209 6 2.9 41

Colorado

2,478.0 3.9 1,066 12 4.1 17

Connecticut

1,681.2 1.2 1,278 4 2.7 45

Delaware

433.0 2.9 1,049 16 1.5 51

District of Columbia

736.9 0.9 1,696 1 3.7 28

Florida

8,009.6 3.5 911 28 3.1 40

Georgia

4,131.9 3.7 958 21 3.8 25

Hawaii

638.3 0.7 908 29 4.2 15

Idaho

650.7 2.5 782 50 4.0 20

Illinois

5,844.1 1.4 1,089 8 2.8 42

Indiana

2,946.5 1.7 846 41 3.9 22

Iowa

1,527.6 1.1 870 38 4.3 11

Kansas

1,377.2 1.3 855 39 2.6 46

Kentucky

1,852.2 1.8 836 43 4.1 17

Louisiana

1,954.0 2.1 923 26 3.8 25

Maine

592.7 0.9 826 44 5.1 4

Maryland

2,590.3 1.3 1,113 7 3.5 31

Massachusetts

3,415.6 2.2 1,315 3 4.5 5

Michigan

4,158.9 2.1 984 20 3.3 37

Minnesota

2,762.9 1.4 1,024 17 3.6 30

Mississippi

1,118.6 1.0 747 51 2.3 47

Missouri

2,709.8 1.5 891 32 3.4 34

Montana

442.2 0.5 794 48 4.5 5

Nebraska

958.1 1.4 837 42 5.2 3

Nevada

1,229.6 4.2 899 30 1.6 50

New Hampshire

638.0 1.4 1,081 10 6.3 2

New Jersey

3,933.6 1.3 1,211 5 2.0 49

New Mexico

808.4 1.3 850 40 4.4 10

New York

9,067.6 2.0 1,321 2 4.3 11

North Carolina

4,141.8 2.4 890 33 3.4 34

North Dakota

454.8 4.5 1,050 15 7.1 1

Ohio

5,264.3 1.6 922 27 3.9 22

Oklahoma

1,614.3 2.1 876 36 2.8 42

Oregon

1,755.4 3.2 928 23 3.8 25

Pennsylvania

5,716.5 1.2 1,013 18 3.7 28

Rhode Island

471.5 1.9 1,003 19 4.5 5

South Carolina

1,931.4 2.9 817 46 3.2 39

South Dakota

412.5 1.3 791 49 4.2 15

Tennessee

2,822.1 2.4 927 24 3.5 31

Texas

11,662.7 3.7 1,070 11 4.3 11

Utah

1,324.2 3.0 872 37 4.3 11

Vermont

311.0 0.7 882 34 4.1 17

Virginia

3,691.4 0.6 1,057 14 2.8 42

Washington

3,069.7 3.2 1,082 9 4.5 5

West Virginia

712.0 0.1 818 45 3.3 37

Wisconsin

2,789.3 1.3 894 31 3.4 34

Wyoming

283.6 1.5 952 22 3.9 22

Puerto Rico

944.2 -1.5 556 (3) 0.7 (3)

Virgin Islands

38.5 -0.3 746 (3) -1.2 (3)

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(3) Data not included in the national ranking.
 

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
 

 Chart 1. Average weekly wages by county in California, fourth quarter 2014

Last Modified Date: Thursday, September 03, 2015

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News Release Information

15-1739-SAN Thursday, September 03, 2015

Contacts

Technical information:
Media contact:
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County Employment and Wages in California – Fourth Quarter 2014

Employment increased in all 26 of California’s large counties from December 2013 to December 2014, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (Large counties are defined as those with employment of 75,000 or more as measured by 2013 annual average employment.) Regional Commissioner Richard J. Holden noted that employment increases ranged from 4.8 percent in San Mateo County to 0.3 percent in Kern County.

Nationally, employment advanced 2.2 percent from December 2013 to December 2014 as 319 of the 339 largest U.S. counties gained jobs. Weld, Colo., and Midland Texas, had the largest percentage increases in the country, each up 8.0 percent over the year. Atlantic, N.J., had the largest over-the-year decrease in employment, down 5.0 percent.

Among the 26 largest counties in California, employment was highest in Los Angeles (4,243,800) in December 2014, while Yolo had the smallest employment level (92,300). Together, California’s large counties accounted for 92.6 percent of total employment within the state. Nationwide, the 339 largest counties made up 72.1 percent of total U.S. employment.

Average weekly wages increased in 25 of the 26 largest counties in California from the fourth quarter of 2013 to the fourth quarter of 2014. Nineteen of these counties had annual wage gains at or above the national increase of 3.5 percent. San Mateo was the only county with a wage decrease, but by level had the highest average weekly wage in the state and the nation ($2,166). Ten additional large counties in the state had average weekly wages that exceeded the national average weekly wage of $1,035. (See table 1.)

Employment and wage levels (but not over-the-year changes) are also available for the 32 counties in California with employment below 75,000. All except one of these smaller counties had average weekly wages below the national average in the fourth quarter of 2014. (See table 2.)

Large county wage changes

Average weekly wages increased over the year in all but 1 of the 26 large counties in California in the fourth quarter of 2014. Yolo County’s 7.1-percent wage gain placed 10th among the nation’s 339 large counties. The over-the-year wage increase in Santa Clara County (6.8 percent) ranked 15th in the national ranking. Wage gains in three additional large counties—Tulare (6.2 percent, 23rd), Marin (5.9 percent, 29th), and Placer (5.8 percent, 31st)—placed in the top 10 percent of the national ranking.

Among the 339 largest U.S. counties, 332 recorded gains in average weekly wages. Benton, Ark., had the largest wage increase (9.9 percent). In contrast, seven large counties nationwide experienced over-the-year decreases in average weekly wages. San Mateo, Calif., had the largest over-the-year wage decline (-20.4 percent).

Large county average weekly wages

Weekly wages in 11 of the state’s 26 large counties were above the national average of $1,035 per week. In the fourth quarter of 2014, average weekly wages in San Mateo ($2,166), Santa Clara ($2,114), and San Francisco ($1,850) ranked in the top five nationally. In contrast, at $739 per week, wages in Tulare ranked 326th among the nation’s 339 largest counties.

Nationally, 95 large counties registered average weekly wages above the U.S. average of $1,035 in the fourth quarter of 2014. In addition to the three California counties mentioned above, New York, N.Y. ($2,138) and Suffolk, Mass. ($1,856) were in the top five nationwide.

Among the 244 counties with an average weekly wage below the U.S. average in the fourth quarter of 2014, Horry County, S.C., reported the lowest average weekly wage ($610), followed by the Texas counties of Cameron ($621) and Hidalgo ($641).

Average weekly wages in California’s smaller counties

All except 1 of the 32 counties in California with employment below 75,000 had average weekly wages lower than the national average of $1,035. Among the smaller counties, Alpine County had the highest average weekly wage at $1,055. Mariposa County reported the lowest weekly wage among all counties in the state, averaging $648 in the fourth quarter of 2014. (See table 2.)

When all 58 counties in California were considered, 6 had wages below $700. Seventeen counties had average weekly wages ranging from $700 to $799, 16 had wages from $800 to $899, 3 had wages from $900 to $999, and 16 had wages at or above $1,000. (See chart 1.)

Additional statistics and other information

QCEW data for states have been included in this release in table 3. For additional information about quarterly employment and wages data, please read the Technical Note or visit www.bls.gov/cew.

Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online features comprehensive information by detailed industry on establishments, employment, and wages for the nation and all states. The 2013 edition of this publication, which was published in September 2014, contains selected data produced by Business Employment Dynamics (BED) on job gains and losses, as well as selected data from the first quarter 2014 version of the national news release. Tables and additional content from Employment and Wages Annual Averages 2013 are now available online at http://www.bls.gov/cew/cewbultn13.htm. The 2014 edition of Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online will be available in September 2015.

The County Employment and Wages release for first quarter 2015 is scheduled to be released on Thursday, September 17, 2015.


Technical Note

Average weekly wage data by county are compiled under the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, also known as the ES-202 program. The data are derived from summaries of employment and total pay of workers covered by state and federal unemployment insurance (UI) legislation and provided by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The 9.2 million employer reports cover 134.0 million full- and part-time workers. The average weekly wage values are calculated by dividing quarterly total wages by the average of the three monthly employment levels of those covered by UI programs. The result is then divided by 13, the number of weeks in a quarter. It is to be noted, therefore, that over-the-year wage changes for geographic areas may reflect shifts in the composition of employment by industry, occupation, and such other factors as hours of work. Thus, wages may vary among counties, metropolitan areas, or states for reasons other than changes in the average wage level. Data for all states, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), counties, and the nation are available on the BLS Web site at www.bls.gov/cew/; however, data in QCEW press releases have been revised (see Technical Note below) and may not match the data contained on the Bureau’s Web site.

QCEW data are not designed as a time series. QCEW data are simply the sums of individual establishment records reflecting the number of establishments that exist in a county or industry at a point in time. Establishments can move in or out of a county or industry for a number of reasons–some reflecting economic events, others reflecting administrative changes.

The preliminary QCEW data presented in this release may differ from data released by the individual states as well as from the data presented on the BLS Web site. These potential differences result from the states’ continuing receipt, review and editing of UI data over time. On the other hand, differences between data in this release and the data found on the BLS Web site are the result of adjustments made to improve over-the-year comparisons. Specifically, these adjustments account for administrative (noneconomic) changes such as a correction to a previously reported location or industry classification. Adjusting for these administrative changes allows users to more accurately assess changes of an economic nature (such as a firm moving from one county to another or changing its primary economic activity) over a 12-month period. Currently, adjusted data are available only from BLS press releases.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay Service: (800) 877-8339.

Table 1. Covered employment and wages in the United States and the 26 largest counties in California, fourth quarter 2014
Area Employment Average Weekly Wage (1)
December 2014 (thousands) Percent change, December 2013-14 (2) National ranking by percent change (3) Average weekly wage National ranking by level (3) Percent change, fourth quarter 2013-14 (2) National ranking by percent change (3)

United States (4)

139,204.8 2.2 -- $1,035 -- 3.5 --

California

16,068.5 2.6 -- 1,209 6 2.9 41

Alameda, Calif.

708.7 2.8 104 1,319 24 4.4 81

Contra Costa, Calif.

344.1 1.8 174 1,215 43 2.1 278

Fresno, Calif.

349.4 0.6 284 808 294 4.9 50

Kern, Calif.

306.9 0.3 303 873 239 2.7 235

Los Angeles, Calif.

4,243.8 1.6 197 1,201 49 3.5 168

Marin, Calif.

112.0 0.6 284 1,280 27 5.9 29

Monterey, Calif.

159.4 1.9 162 851 261 3.7 143

Orange, Calif.

1,506.0 2.6 112 1,162 55 4.3 87

Placer, Calif.

144.6 3.4 71 1,034 96 5.8 31

Riverside, Calif.

641.2 3.5 66 803 301 4.0 113

Sacramento, Calif.

620.7 2.2 140 1,095 68 2.7 235

San Bernardino, Calif.

682.3 4.4 25 852 258 3.5 168

San Diego, Calif.

1,359.7 1.9 162 1,138 58 2.6 244

San Francisco, Calif.

659.1 4.4 25 1,850 5 4.9 50

San Joaquin, Calif.

217.7 2.5 118 835 273 2.5 248

San Luis Obispo, Calif.

109.4 1.8 174 837 270 3.7 143

San Mateo, Calif.

385.0 4.8 18 2,166 1 -20.4 339

Santa Barbara, Calif.

186.5 2.5 118 981 138 4.9 50

Santa Clara, Calif.

999.3 3.6 57 2,114 3 6.8 15

Santa Cruz, Calif.

94.6 3.7 51 926 187 5.0 46

Solano, Calif.

129.6 1.7 183 1,026 104 0.9 322

Sonoma, Calif.

192.0 0.9 259 952 162 4.2 99

Stanislaus, Calif.

170.3 2.5 118 832 277 3.9 125

Tulare, Calif.

146.5 0.7 272 739 326 6.2 23

Ventura, Calif.

317.5 0.9 259 1,025 107 5.0 46

Yolo, Calif.

92.3 1.2 227 1,092 70 7.1 10

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Percent changes were computed from quarterly employment and pay data adjusted for noneconomic county reclassifications.
(3) Ranking does not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(4) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
 

Table 2. Covered employment and wages in the United States and all counties in California, fourth quarter 2014 (2)
Area Employment December 2014 Average Weekly Wage (1)

United States (2)

139,204,840 $1,035

California

16,068,487 1,209

Alameda

708,653 1,319

Alpine

536 1,055

Amador

11,443 816

Butte

76,994 757

Calaveras

8,238 708

Colusa

7,894 851

Contra Costa

344,074 1,215

Del Norte

7,842 703

El Dorado

50,559 899

Fresno

349,436 808

Glenn

8,188 734

Humboldt

46,096 724

Imperial

64,035 685

Inyo

7,279 808

Kern

306,904 873

Kings

43,632 795

Lake

14,985 661

Lassen

10,472 793

Los Angeles

4,243,837 1,201

Madera

46,645 782

Marin

111,966 1,280

Mariposa

4,824 648

Mendocino

31,341 704

Merced

73,806 740

Modoc

2,345 678

Mono

6,574 717

Monterey

159,400 851

Napa

70,226 1,003

Nevada

29,349 842

Orange

1,505,987 1,162

Placer

144,598 1,034

Plumas

5,752 784

Riverside

641,238 803

Sacramento

620,734 1,095

San Benito

15,008 851

San Bernardino

682,327 852

San Diego

1,359,701 1,138

San Francisco

659,074 1,850

San Joaquin

217,711 835

San Luis Obispo

109,429 837

San Mateo

384,952 2,166

Santa Barbara

186,503 981

Santa Clara

999,316 2,114

Santa Cruz

94,644 926

Shasta

62,168 784

Sierra

546 827

Siskiyou

12,499 699

Solano

129,596 1,026

Sonoma

192,046 952

Stanislaus

170,313 832

Sutter

27,062 751

Tehama

16,407 763

Trinity

2,491 677

Tulare

146,544 739

Tuolumne

16,834 783

Ventura

317,505 1,025

Yolo

92,333 1,092

Yuba

16,213 887

Footnotes
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

NOTE: Includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs. Data are preliminary.
 

Table 3. Covered employment and wages by state, fourth quarter 2014
State Employment Average weekly wage (1)
December 2014 (thousands) Percent change, December 2013-14 Average weekly wage National ranking by level Percent change, fourth quarter 2013-14 National ranking by percent change

United States (2)

139,204.8 2.2 $1,035 -- 3.5 --

Alabama

1,891.4 1.3 881 35 3.5 31

Alaska

317.6 0.8 1,063 13 4.0 20

Arizona

2,630.8 2.2 926 25 2.3 47

Arkansas

1,180.5 2.2 807 47 4.5 5

California

16,068.5 2.6 1,209 6 2.9 41

Colorado

2,478.0 3.9 1,066 12 4.1 17

Connecticut

1,681.2 1.2 1,278 4 2.7 45

Delaware

433.0 2.9 1,049 16 1.5 51

District of Columbia

736.9 0.9 1,696 1 3.7 28

Florida

8,009.6 3.5 911 28 3.1 40

Georgia

4,131.9 3.7 958 21 3.8 25

Hawaii

638.3 0.7 908 29 4.2 15

Idaho

650.7 2.5 782 50 4.0 20

Illinois

5,844.1 1.4 1,089 8 2.8 42

Indiana

2,946.5 1.7 846 41 3.9 22

Iowa

1,527.6 1.1 870 38 4.3 11

Kansas

1,377.2 1.3 855 39 2.6 46

Kentucky

1,852.2 1.8 836 43 4.1 17

Louisiana

1,954.0 2.1 923 26 3.8 25

Maine

592.7 0.9 826 44 5.1 4

Maryland

2,590.3 1.3 1,113 7 3.5 31

Massachusetts

3,415.6 2.2 1,315 3 4.5 5

Michigan

4,158.9 2.1 984 20 3.3 37

Minnesota

2,762.9 1.4 1,024 17 3.6 30

Mississippi

1,118.6 1.0 747 51 2.3 47

Missouri

2,709.8 1.5 891 32 3.4 34

Montana

442.2 0.5 794 48 4.5 5

Nebraska

958.1 1.4 837 42 5.2 3

Nevada

1,229.6 4.2 899 30 1.6 50

New Hampshire

638.0 1.4 1,081 10 6.3 2

New Jersey

3,933.6 1.3 1,211 5 2.0 49

New Mexico

808.4 1.3 850 40 4.4 10

New York

9,067.6 2.0 1,321 2 4.3 11

North Carolina

4,141.8 2.4 890 33 3.4 34

North Dakota

454.8 4.5 1,050 15 7.1 1

Ohio

5,264.3 1.6 922 27 3.9 22

Oklahoma

1,614.3 2.1 876 36 2.8 42

Oregon

1,755.4 3.2 928 23 3.8 25

Pennsylvania

5,716.5 1.2 1,013 18 3.7 28

Rhode Island

471.5 1.9 1,003 19 4.5 5

South Carolina

1,931.4 2.9 817 46 3.2 39

South Dakota

412.5 1.3 791 49 4.2 15

Tennessee

2,822.1 2.4 927 24 3.5 31

Texas

11,662.7 3.7 1,070 11 4.3 11

Utah

1,324.2 3.0 872 37 4.3 11

Vermont

311.0 0.7 882 34 4.1 17

Virginia

3,691.4 0.6 1,057 14 2.8 42

Washington

3,069.7 3.2 1,082 9 4.5 5

West Virginia

712.0 0.1 818 45 3.3 37

Wisconsin

2,789.3 1.3 894 31 3.4 34

Wyoming

283.6 1.5 952 22 3.9 22

Puerto Rico

944.2 -1.5 556 (3) 0.7 (3)

Virgin Islands

38.5 -0.3 746 (3) -1.2 (3)

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(3) Data not included in the national ranking.
 

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
 

 Chart 1. Average weekly wages by county in California, fourth quarter 2014

Last Modified Date: Thursday, September 03, 2015